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I have heard a lot of guys here saying that C++ is as fast or faster than C in everything, but cleaner and nicer.

While I do not contradict the fact that C++ is very elegant, and quite fast, I did not find any replacement for critical memory access or processor-bound applications.

Question: is there an equivalent in C++ for C-style arrays in terms of performance?

The example below is contrived, but I am interested in the solution for real-life problems: I develop image processing apps, and the amount of pixel processing there is huge.

double t;

// C++ 
std::vector<int> v;
v.resize(1000000,1);
int i, j, count = 0, size = v.size();

t = (double)getTickCount();

for(j=0;j<1000;j++)
{
    count = 0;
    for(i=0;i<size;i++)
         count += v[i];     
}

t = ((double)getTickCount() - t)/getTickFrequency();
std::cout << "(C++) For loop time [s]: " << t/1.0 << std::endl;
std::cout << count << std::endl;

// C-style

#define ARR_SIZE 1000000

int* arr = (int*)malloc( ARR_SIZE * sizeof(int) );

int ci, cj, ccount = 0, csize = ARR_SIZE;

for(ci=0;ci<csize;ci++)
    arr[ci] = 1;

t = (double)getTickCount();

for(cj=0;cj<1000;cj++)
{
    ccount = 0;
    for(ci=0;ci<csize;ci++)
        ccount += arr[ci];      
}

free(arr);

t = ((double)getTickCount() - t)/getTickFrequency();
std::cout << "(C) For loop time [s]: " << t/1.0 << std::endl;
std::cout << ccount << std::endl;

Here is the result:

(C++) For loop time [s]: 0.329069

(C) For loop time [s]: 0.229961

Note: getTickCount() comes from a third-party lib. If you want to test, just replace with your favourite clock measurement

Update:

I am using VS 2010, Release mode, everything else default

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8  
I doubt you did a full-optimization C++ build. –  Luchian Grigore Aug 29 '12 at 8:03
5  
There is no pointer array in this code ... –  unwind Aug 29 '12 at 8:03
2  
I just tested this (with slightly modified code, on one computer, with one particular compiler). Without optimisations, the "C++ style" one is about one third slower than the "C style" one. With optimisations, the "C++ style" one is consistently slightly faster than the "C style" one (and both are much faster than without optimisation). –  Mankarse Aug 29 '12 at 8:10
3  
I get .215 seconds for both the C and C++ versions on my machine. (GCC and G++ on x86-64 machine). C++ is faster 32-bit, for some reason (.534/.605). –  David Schwartz Aug 29 '12 at 8:13
2  
I get the same runtime for both versions when compiling with g++ -O3. –  halex Aug 29 '12 at 8:15

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Question: is there an equivalent in C++ for C-style arrays in terms of performance?

Answer: Write C++ code! Know your language, know your standard library and use it. Standard algorithms are correct, readable and fast (They know the best how to implement it to be fast on the current compiler).

void testC()
{
    // unchanged
}

void testCpp()
{
    // unchanged initialization

    for(j=0;j<1000;j++)
    {
        // how a C++ programmer accumulates:
        count = std::accumulate(begin(v), end(v), 0);    
    }

    // unchanged output
}

int main()
{
    testC();
    testCpp();
}

Output:

(C) For loop time [ms]: 434.373
1000000
(C++) For loop time [ms]: 419.79
1000000

Compiled with g++ -O3 -std=c++0x Version 4.6.3 on Ubuntu.

For your code my output is similiar to yours. user1202136 gives a good answer about the differences...

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2  
+1 for accumulate. –  juanchopanza Aug 29 '12 at 8:38
1  
Finally an actual answer. –  Lubo Antonov Aug 29 '12 at 8:40
1  
could you post your time profiling code? I am getting pretty strange results when I use std::accumulate. –  juanchopanza Aug 29 '12 at 8:58
    
@juanchopanza I used gettimeofday from <sys/time.h> –  hansmaad Aug 29 '12 at 9:03
    
I think this is the answer... although on my test platform (MSVC) it's slower than everything else. But I cannot blame C++ for what seems to be Microsoft's fault –  sammy Aug 29 '12 at 12:05

Simple answer: Your benchmark is flawed.

Longer answer: You need to turn on full optimization to get C++ performance advantage. Yet your benchmark is still flawed.

Some observations:

  1. If you turn on full optimization, a very large chunk of for-loop would be removed. This make your benchmark meaningless.
  2. std::vector have overhead for dynamic reallocation, try std::array.
    To be specific, microsoft's stl have checked iterator by default.
  3. You don't have any barrier to prevent cross reordering between C / C++ code / benchmark code.
  4. (not really related) cout << ccount is locale aware, printf is not; std::endl flush the output, printf("\n") don't.

The "traditional" code for showing c++ advantage is C qsort() vs C++ std::sort(). This is where code inlineing shines.

If you want some "real-life" application example. Search for some raytracer or matrix multiplication stuff. Pick an compiler that do auto vectorization.

Update Using the LLVM online demo, we can see the whole loop is reordered. The benchmark code is moved to start, and it jump to the loop ending point in the first loop for better branch prediction:

(this is c++ code)

######### jump to the loop end
    jg  .LBB0_11
.LBB0_3:                                # %..split_crit_edge
.Ltmp2:
# print the benchmark result
    movl    $0, 12(%esp)
    movl    $25, 8(%esp)
    movl    $.L.str, 4(%esp)
    movl    std::cout, (%esp)
    calll   std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >& std::__ostream_insert<char, std::char_traits<char> >(std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >&, char const*, long)
.Ltmp3:
# BB#4:                                 # %_ZStlsISt11char_traitsIcEERSt13basic_ostreamIcT_ES5_PKc.exit
.Ltmp4:
    movl    std::cout, (%esp)
    calll   std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >& std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >::_M_insert<double>(double)
.Ltmp5:
# BB#5:                                 # %_ZNSolsEd.exit
    movl    %eax, %ecx
    movl    %ecx, 28(%esp)          # 4-byte Spill
    movl    (%ecx), %eax
    movl    -24(%eax), %eax
    movl    240(%eax,%ecx), %ebp
    testl   %ebp, %ebp
    jne .LBB0_7
# BB#6:
.Ltmp52:
    calll   std::__throw_bad_cast()
.Ltmp53:
.LBB0_7:                                # %.noexc41
    cmpb    $0, 28(%ebp)
    je  .LBB0_15
# BB#8:
    movb    39(%ebp), %al
    jmp .LBB0_21
    .align  16, 0x90
.LBB0_9:                                #   Parent Loop BB0_11 Depth=1
                                        # =>  This Inner Loop Header: Depth=2
    addl    (%edi,%edx,4), %ebx
    addl    $1, %edx
    adcl    $0, %esi
    cmpl    %ecx, %edx
    jne .LBB0_9
# BB#10:                                #   in Loop: Header=BB0_11 Depth=1
    incl    %eax
    cmpl    $1000, %eax             # imm = 0x3E8
######### jump back to the print benchmark code
    je  .LBB0_3

My test code:

std::vector<int> v;
v.resize(1000000,1);
int i, j, count = 0, size = v.size();

for(j=0;j<1000;j++)
{
    count = 0;
    for(i=0;i<size;i++)
         count += v[i];     
}

std::cout << "(C++) For loop time [s]: " << t/1.0 << std::endl;
std::cout << count << std::endl;
share|improve this answer
1  
Hmmm, I have used default Release mode in MSVC. And I tried to get out of the loop all the allocation/ output, etc. std::cout is strategically out of the benchmark. It rather seems to be a compiler problem, 'cause g++ gives equal times for both codes –  sammy Aug 29 '12 at 8:31
1  
Are you saying he's "holding it wrong"? His code is a valid benchmark and it should generate the same instructions for both languages. That it is not points to a problem in the compiler or the STL. –  Lubo Antonov Aug 29 '12 at 8:37
2  
(2) is not true. The array is resized in advance before the time checking, so no reallocation is performed. As to (1) I'd (partially) unwind the loop (to reduce loop-related stuff) and make count volatile to exclude undesired optimization –  user396672 Aug 29 '12 at 8:41
1  
@user396672, making ccount volatile would prevent vectorization as well. We need to stop loop-inversion/elimination, not vectorization. –  J-16 SDiZ Aug 29 '12 at 8:49
2  
@J-16SDiZ In 2010 the default value of _SECURE_SCL is 0 msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa985896.aspx –  hansmaad Aug 29 '12 at 8:56

It seems to be a compiler problem. For C-arrays, the compiler detects the pattern, uses auto-vectorization and emits SSE instructions. For vector, it seems to lack the necessary intelligence.

If I force the compiler not to use SSE, the results are very similar (tested with g++ -mno-mmx -mno-sse -msoft-float -O3):

(C++) For loop time [us]: 604610
1000000
(C) For loop time [us]: 601493
1000000

Here is the code that generated this output. It is basically the code in your question, but without any floating point.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <sys/time.h>

using namespace std;

long getTickCount()
{
    struct timeval tv;
    gettimeofday(&tv, NULL);
    return tv.tv_sec * 1000000 + tv.tv_usec;
}

int main() {
long t;

// C++ 
std::vector<int> v;
v.resize(1000000,1);
int i, j, count = 0, size = v.size();

t = getTickCount();

for(j=0;j<1000;j++)
{
    count = 0;
    for(i=0;i<size;i++)
         count += v[i];     
}

t = getTickCount() - t;
std::cout << "(C++) For loop time [us]: " << t << std::endl;
std::cout << count << std::endl;

// C-style

#define ARR_SIZE 1000000

int* arr = new int[ARR_SIZE];

int ci, cj, ccount = 0, csize = ARR_SIZE;

for(ci=0;ci<csize;ci++)
    arr[ci] = 1;

t = getTickCount();

for(cj=0;cj<1000;cj++)
{
    ccount = 0;
    for(ci=0;ci<csize;ci++)
        ccount += arr[ci];      
}

delete arr;

t = getTickCount() - t;
std::cout << "(C) For loop time [us]: " << t << std::endl;
std::cout << ccount << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This has nothing to do with SSE or MMX. It's only about having optimization turned on. Also, gettimeofday() is a bad choice for benchmarking because it also records the time spent outside the process. Use getrusage() if you are on unix. –  Nordic Mainframe Aug 29 '12 at 9:09
5  
@LutherBlissett I'm sorry, but SSE or MMX is the problem. I checked the assembler output. Optimizations were already turned on through -O3. I used gettimeofday as I heard getrusage had a bad resolution. To reduce benchmark error, I made sure the system was mostly idle and I ran the benchmark several times, with similar results. –  user1202136 Aug 29 '12 at 9:19

The C++ equivalent of a dynamically sized array would be std::vector. The C++ equivalent of a fixed size array would be std::array or std::tr1::array pre-C++11.

If your vector code has no re-sizings it is hard to see how it could be significantly slower than using a dynamically allocated C array, provided you compile with some optimization enabled.

Note: running the code as posted, compiled on gcc 4.4.3 on x86, compiler options

g++ -Wall -Wextra -pedantic-errors -O2 -std=c++0x

the results are repeatably close to

(C++) For loop time [us]: 507888

1000000

(C) For loop time [us]: 496659

1000000

So, seemingly ~2% slower for the std::vector variant after a small number of trials. I'd consider this compatible performance.

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1  
The profiling starts after the vector is initialized, so that can't be the problem... –  Luchian Grigore Aug 29 '12 at 8:06
1  
Resizing from zero is probably no different from allocating. –  David Schwartz Aug 29 '12 at 8:06
1  
@DavidSchwartz probably, but it seems unnecessary and is a sign of not knowing much about std::vector. –  juanchopanza Aug 29 '12 at 8:08
8  
My point is that this doesn't answer his question at all. –  David Schwartz Aug 29 '12 at 8:09
1  
@DavidSchwartz Good point. –  juanchopanza Aug 29 '12 at 8:20

What you point out is the fact that accessing objects will always come with a little overhead, so accessing a vector won't be faster than accessing a good old array.

But even if using an array is "C-stylish", it remains C++ so it won't be a problem.

Then, as @juanchopanza said, there is std::array in C++11, which may be more efficient than std::vector, but specialized for fixed-size array.

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5  
"there is std::array in C++11, which is more efficient than std::vector." can you back this up? –  Luchian Grigore Aug 29 '12 at 8:10
1  
Array is more efficient if you do operations on a vector that change its size, such as looping over push_back without resize. –  David Schwartz Aug 29 '12 at 8:13
1  
Well you can't do these operations with arrays in the first place... –  Zulan Aug 29 '12 at 8:20
2  
array may be more efficient for example because vector involves an extra level of indirection (it contains a pointer to the data, while array contains the data). Yes, the compiler will hoist the reading of that data pointer outside the loop, but doing so costs you a register (to store it in), whereas accesses to a std::array can be based straight off the stack pointer. Using one register is a minor performance issue, but it might make a difference sometimes. For the same reason, array may be slower, because using more stack affects caching. "May" is an easy target to reach :-) –  Steve Jessop Aug 29 '12 at 9:20
    
If nothing else, I would expect std::array to be faster in general due to stack allocation generally outperforming heap allocation, and std::array having one less pointer indirection, as you said. I would expect access through a pointer to a dynamically allocated std::array to be the same as access to a std::vector. At least in many of my domains, heap allocation / deallocation is the single biggest performance killer in general. –  David Stone Apr 7 '13 at 3:01

Usually Compiler does all the optimization... You have just to choose a good compiler

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