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Normally, I do something like this:

public showDialog(final Object caller) {
    JDialog dialog = [ ... ]

    if (caller instanceof Window) {
        Window w = (Window) caller;
        dialog.setLocationRelativeTo(w);
        w.dispose();
    }
}

However, is there a one-line way to do it? Basically, something like: (Window) parent.dispose(); Or do I always need to create a Window to store my cast?

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up vote 11 down vote accepted

Yes:

dialog.setLocationRelativeTo((Window) caller);

If you want to call a method on the casted value, you'll have to enclose it into a set of parenthesis:

((Window) caller).dispose();

Personally I'd only do that if that's the only thing I do with it. If there are two or more statements where I needed the value with the cast, then I'd use an explicit variable as you've done in your original code.

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Yes, just wrap the cast in another set of parentheses:

((Window) parent).dispose();

Not particularly beautiful though.

Or do I always need to create a Window to store my cast?

Keep in mind that you're not creating a Window - you're creating a reference to the Window you already have (which is quite cheap).

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You can write

if (caller instanceof Window) {
    dialog.setLocationRelativeTo((Window) caller);
    ((Window) caller).dispose();
}

I would suggest you do what is clearer and not worry too much about the number of lines.

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Of course you can. Your 3 lines would become:

dialog.setLocationRelativeTo((Window) caller);
((Window) caller).dispose();
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For clarity I often cast in a slightly different way

dialog.setLocationRelativeTo(Window.class.cast(caller));
Window.class.cast(caller).dispose();

This I think explicitly tells the reader what you are doing. Although the () cast syntax is commonly known I think that idiom relies on specific java knowledge.

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This is fairly nice. Is it simply syntax sugar? Or is it the other way around, and the () syntax is converted to X.class.cast(y) ? – Redandwhite Aug 29 '12 at 16:41
    
Redandwhite. in your example y is cast to x. I added this to another question a while ago and stackoverflow.com/a/11745449/846476 @yshavit looked at the byte code which was interesting. – RNJ Aug 29 '12 at 18:28

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