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I'm using IO.popen in Ruby to run a series of command line commands in a loop. I then need to run another command outside of the loop. The command outside of the loop cannot run until all of the commands in the loop have terminated. How do I make the program wait for this to happen, because at the moment the final command is running too soon.

An example:

for foo in bar
    IO.popen(cmd_foo)
end
IO.popen(another_cmd)

So all cmd_foos need to return before another_cmd is run.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you'd need to assign the results from the IO.popen calls within the cycle to the variables, and keep calling the .read() of them until the .eof() becomes true on all of these. Then you know that all the programs have finished their execution and you can start another_cmd.

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2  
Just as an additional note: using the block form of IO methods is usually safer. Also, in 1.9 you get added robustness because block variables have different scoping which prevents modification of same named variables outside the block (and you'll earn a warning). –  Robert Klemme Aug 7 '09 at 9:50

Use the block form and read all the content:

IO.popen "cmd" do |io|
  # 1 array
  io.readlines

  # alternative, 1 big String
  io.read

  # or, if you have to do something with the output
  io.each do |line|
    puts line
  end

  # if you just want to ignore the output, I'd do
  io.each {||}
end

If you do not read the output, it may be that the process blocks because the pipe connecting the other process and your process is full and nobody reads from it.

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Would IO.popen('cmd').close work when discarding stdout? Docs say it sets $? (thus waits), but I'm not clear it it also discards all stdout without blocking. –  Ciro Santilli 六四事件 法轮功 纳米比亚胡海峰 Nov 6 '14 at 13:55
    
What exactly do you mean by "discarding stdout"? The code you show does not discard anything. If you want to just execute something and not do anything special with the output system() is more appropriate, –  Robert Klemme Jan 30 at 10:52
    
by "discard stdout" I meant "read the output", which this answer said may be required to prevent blocking. –  Ciro Santilli 六四事件 法轮功 纳米比亚胡海峰 Jan 31 at 22:41
    
But what is the goal? Do you really want to discard output? Then you must read it and simply ignore it. In that case system() is not a good alternative unless you would redirect stdout to /dev/null. Generally stdout and stderr must be read because otherwise you risk blocking the process. –  Robert Klemme Feb 11 at 12:37

Apparently the canonical way to do this is:

 Process.wait(popened_io.pid)
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This answer is the most correct. No side effects (like with io.read), and very obvious what it's doing. –  siannopollo Jun 12 '14 at 18:19
for foo in bar
  out = IO.popen(cmd_foo)
  out.readlines
end
IO.popen(another_cmd)

Reading the output to a variable then calling out.readlines did it. I think that out.readlines must wait for the process to end before it returns. Credit to Andrew Y for pointing me in the right direction.

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I tried the exact same thing and ended up with zombies (defunct), so not ideal –  nhed Apr 7 '14 at 15:01
    
It is missing out.close –  Eric Woodruff Jan 28 at 1:47

I suggest you use Thread.join to synchronise the last popen call:

t = Thread.new do
    for foo in bar
       IO.popen(cmd_foo)
    end
end

t.join

IO.popen(another_cmd)
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Do you need the output of popen? If not, do you want to use Kernel#system or some other command?

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If you only need the output, why not use backsticks?

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