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I have a sample code

aCommand.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
aCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@book_id", bookID);
aCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@user_id", userID);

and after that I want to execute a simple query using CommandText:

aCommand.CommandText = "SELECT * FROM aTABLE";
aCommand.ExecuteNonQuery();

but the error occurs:

Exception: Could not find stored procedure 'SELECT * FROM aTABLE'

In this case, I have to create a new instance of SqlCommand object ?

It is a way to use same SqlCommand object to avoid create one ?

share|improve this question
2  
You have to change the commandtype back to text before you try yo execute the query. – Ademar Aug 29 '12 at 8:36
3  
"In this case, I have to create a new instance of SqlCommand object ?" I would suggest to do so to avoid such confusions. Creating a SqlCommand is not so expensive that you need to reuse it. Actually the constructor does not more than setting the properties. – Tim Schmelter Aug 29 '12 at 8:39
1  
Not sure, but I think you should also call aCommand.Parameters.Clear(); – Steve Aug 29 '12 at 8:40
up vote 10 down vote accepted

It should be

aCommand.CommandType = CommandType.Text

actually, the default value of CommandType is CommandType.Text

share|improve this answer
    
Upvoted. Good point, I have to read books :). Simple and clear. – Snake Eyes Aug 29 '12 at 8:38
    
Thanks. is this the query you want to execute? SELECT * FROM aTABLE? If so, remove the parameters you have added. @SnakeEyes – John Woo Aug 29 '12 at 8:46
    
I provided an example, in that query I didn't use parameters so if SqlCommand has paramters, no matter because I didn't use them in query. – Snake Eyes Aug 29 '12 at 8:48

The problem is that you have reused a SqlCommand that CommandType is StoredProcedure but you want to execute a normal sql query with CommandType.Text.

"In this case, I have to create a new instance of SqlCommand object ?"

I would suggest to do so to avoid such confusions. Creating a SqlCommand is not so expensive that you need to reuse it. Actually the constructor does not more than setting the properties.

From ILSpy:

// System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand
// this() does only call _SuppressFinalize
public SqlCommand(string cmdText, SqlConnection connection) : this()
{
    this.CommandText = cmdText;
    this.Connection = connection;
}
share|improve this answer
aCommand.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
aCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@book_id", bookID);
aCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@user_id", userID);
  1. specify the stored procedure name you call

    aCommand.CommandText=yourstoredprocedurename;
    aCommand.ExecuteNonQuery();
    
  2. then call your select and sqlreader to get result

    bCommand.CommandType = CommandType.Text
    bCommand.CommandText = "SELECT * FROM aTABLE";
    SqlDataReader rdr = bCommand.ExecuteReader();
    
share|improve this answer

You have to construct new Command object to erase previously set parameters and value.

aCommand=new SqlCommand();
aCommand.Connection=cn;
aCommand.CommandText = "SELECT * FROM aTABLE";
SqlDataReader reader=aCommand.ExecuteReader();

Call ExecuteReader() method instead of ExecuteNonQuery to fetch the database result.

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