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i need to make low latency server, where raw data throughput is less important than the ability to handle thousands of simultaneous connections. I don't know what language to use. Java is simpler, development will be faster, nice interface for all what i need + good support for networking (JAVA NIO and selector class). But actually i don't have much experience with java beside programming, so even if i read things like java isn't today slower then native C/C++, still have some doubts about the performence, because c/c++ is compiled to binary code, but java .class files are interpreted, so there MUST be overhead in that translating.

  • Can someone post his own experience?
  • Have someone low latency app programmed?
  • What you mean is better to use for that type of application?

EDIT: App will be server for support real-time on web applications (like chat, etc.)

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closed as not constructive by Kiril Kirov, AProgrammer, Bo Persson, edorian, Mark Aug 29 '12 at 13:08

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maba: Yes, thx, fail english. –  Krab Aug 29 '12 at 9:23
    
What is your latency requirement as "low latency" can mean just about anything? What is the latency of your network to your clients? –  Peter Lawrey Aug 29 '12 at 9:27
    
Many exchanges use Java and has no problems with latency. Nasdaq INET is one example of a low latency platform written in Java. –  maba Aug 29 '12 at 9:28
    
peter lawrey: I mean server must handle requests with lowest time possible. My english is not so good and i copy that theorem from hc.apache.org, because i mean, java NIO is done for things like that and there stay "The blocking I/O model may be more appropriate for data intensive, low latency scenarios, whereas the non-blocking model may be more appropriate for high latency scenarios where raw data throughput is less important than the ability to handle thousands of simultaneous ...", so i mean high latency is something like high level of responsibility or something like this. –  Krab Aug 29 '12 at 9:31
    

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Usually people want a low latency application so I don't know what you mean by low latency.

so even if i read things like java isn't today slower then native C/C++

Its still slightly slower, just not enough to matter most of the time.

For example, network IO is network IO regardless of the language you use. e.g. The language won't make your network faster or slower except in the most extreme low latency cases.

, because c/c++ is compiled to binary code, but java .class files are interpreted,

Java is compiled to native code at runtime so both system run native code in the end.

so there MUST be overhead in that translating.

There is a overhead on startup. But once the application is running, the impact is much less.

Have someone high latency app programmed?

If your network has high latency, your language is less likely to matter.

What you mean is better to use for that type of application?

I suggest you use the language you are most comfortable with.

App will be server for support real-time on web applications

In that case, your network latency is likely to be far higher than that of your application if you have coded it properly.


To give you a broad idea, a typical internet connect has a latency of 5 - 20 ms. A typical user can only react with a latency of 50 ms. A server with a latency of 20 - 50 ms can be written in just about any language. A server with a latency of 200 - 500 micro-seconds can be written in Java or C++. If you want less than 100 micro-seconds, including the latency to the client, you are looking at specialist hardware and some C++ code for your core engine. In that case, the server and the consumer will probably be in the same building, if not the same rack.

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Ok, thx, that is what i want to see :), so i don't need make that app in C++. But if on hc.apache.org is "The blocking I/O model may be more appropriate for data intensive, low latency scenarios, whereas the non-blocking model may be more appropriate for high latency scenarios", that mean, java asynchronnous NIO isn't good for handling thousands of connections and have low latency between request and response? So if i not use selectors, what i can use? Isn't possible thread per connection :/. –  Krab Aug 29 '12 at 9:46
    
Having thousands of connections on one server is not good for low latency. You will have to make compromises. Google give fast searches in part because they have about one million servers. You need to have a clear idea of what your latency requirements are and how your network compares, otherwise there is no way you can make these decisions. Using plain IO can save you 30 - 100 micro-seconds provided you have more cpus than active connections. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 29 '12 at 9:49
    
@Krab NIO is non-bloking, and so is good for thousands of connections. It has slightly more latency than bloking I/O, but difference is in range of 0.3-3 milliseconds (depends on many factors). –  Alexei Kaigorodov Aug 29 '12 at 10:03
    
@AlexeiKaigorodov NIO is by default blocking, the non-blocking version is the one which gets the most press. ;) I tend to use blocking NIO which I find to be faster than blocking IO for a small number of connections. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 29 '12 at 10:06

Most JVM implementations are using just in time (JIT) compilation techniques, so they can be nearly as efficient as ahead-of-time compiled programs (in C++ or Ocaml).

The JVM will usually translate to machine code (incrementally, and once) the hot spots of your .class bytecode files.

You might consider using other languages like Ocaml (using Ocsigen for the web part) or Opa

Of course, you could always rewrite the very critical part of your application in C (or in C++) and call that from Java (or Ocaml, or other language) code.

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