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I doubt it can be done portably, but are there any solutions out there? I think it could be done by creating an alternate stack and reseting SP,BP, and IP on function entry, and having yield save IP and restore SP+BP. Destructors and exception safety seem tricky but solvable.

Has it been done? Is it impossible?

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15 Answers 15

up vote 61 down vote accepted

Yes it can be done without a problem. All you need is a little assembly code to move the call stack to a newly allocated stack on the heap.

I would look at the boost::coroutine library.

The one thing that you should watch out for is a stack overflow. On most operating systems overflowing the stack will cause a segfault because virtual memory page is not mapped. However if you allocate the stack on the heap you don't get any guarantee. Just keep that in mind.

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63  
I think there should be a badge for being able to mention thze work "stackoverflow" in a valid technical context on SO! – Torsten Marek Sep 23 '08 at 15:51
5  
Here's a nice standard C++ solution that doesn't require involving Boost : akira.ruc.dk/~keld/research/COROUTINE – Dan Sep 26 '08 at 15:59
    
If you allocate the stack on the heap, you can do the same thing as the real stack and put a guard page at the end (or start, since it usually grows backwards) that will also cause a segfault on small overflows. – Leushenko Feb 5 at 15:34

On POSIX, you can use makecontext()/swapcontext() routines to portably switch execution contexts. On Windows, you can use the fiber API. Otherwise, all you need is a bit of glue assembly code that switches the machine context. I have implemented coroutines both with ASM (for AMD64) and with swapcontext(); neither is very hard.

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12  
Unfortunately makecontext() and its related functions have been marked obsolescent in the IEEE 1003.1 Posix Standard in 2001 (pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009695399/functions/…) and have been removed from that standard in 2008 (blog.fpmurphy.com/2009/01/ieee-std-10031-2008.html). Also with older pthread implementations these functions are known to break a lot of stuff, and since they are now non standard hardly anybody will care about breaking them again. – LiKao Feb 14 '12 at 9:47

For posterity,

Dmitry Vyukov's wondeful web site has a clever trick using ucontext and setjump to simulated coroutines in c++.

Also, Oliver Kowalke's context library was recently accepted into Boost, so hopefully we'll be seeing an updated version of boost.coroutine that works on x86_64 soon.

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There's no easy way to implement coroutine. Because coroutine itself is out of C/C++'s stack abstraction just like thread. So it cannot be supported without language level changes to support.

Currently(C++11), all existing C++ coroutine implementations are all based on assembly level hacking which is hard to be safe and reliable crossing over platforms. To be reliable it needs to be standard, and handled by compilers rather than hacking.

There's a standard proposal - N3708 for this. Check it out if you're interested.

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I dont think there are many full-blown, clean implementations in C++. One try that I like is protothread library.

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You might be better off with an iterator than a coroutine if possible. That way you can keep calling next() to get the next value, but you can keep your state as member variables instead of local variables.

It might make things more maintainable. Another C++ developer might not immediately understand the coroutine whereas they might be more familiar with an iterator.

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Does COROUTINE a portable C++ library for coroutine sequencing point you in the right direction? It seems like an elegant solution that has lasted the test of time.....it's 9 years old!

In the DOC folder is a pdf of the paper A Portable C++ Library for Coroutine Sequencing by Keld Helsgaun which describes the library and provides short examples using it.

[update] I'm actually making successful use of it myself. Curiosity got the better of me, so I looked into this solution, and found it was a good fit for a problem I've been working on for some time!

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A new library, Boost.Context, was released today with portable features for implementing coroutines.

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It is based on (cringe) macros, but the following site provides an easy-to-use generator implementation: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cpp/cpp_generators.aspx

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This is an old thread, but I would like to suggest a hack using Duff's device that is not os-dependent (as far as I remember):

C coroutines using Duff's device

And as an example, here is a telnet library I modified to use coroutines instead of fork/threads: Telnet cli library using coroutines

And since standard C prior to C99 is essentially a true subset of C++, this works well in C++ too.

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I've come up with an implementation without asm code. The idea is to use the system's thread creating function to initialize stack and context, and use setjmp/longjmp to switch context. But It's not portable, see the tricky pthread version if you are interested.

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You should always consider using threads instead; especially in modern hardware. If you have work that can be logically separated in Co-routines, using threads means the work might actually be done concurrently, by separate execution units (processor cores).

But, maybe you do want to use coroutines, perhaps because you have an well tested algorithm that has already been written and tested that way, or because you are porting code written that way.

If you work within Windows, you should take a look at fibers. Fibers will give you a coroutine-like framework with support from the OS.

I am not familiar with other OS's to recommend alternatives there.

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I disagree about blindly favoring threads over fibers. In an optimal system the number of threads trying to run is equal to then number of cores (more if hyper threading). In a solution with LOTS of threads(100s), a thread pool running fibers can be far more efficient. – deft_code Oct 15 '09 at 14:24
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Thanks for commenting. However, I didn't say "blindly favor"; I said "always consider". I agree that there are circumstances where fibers or other coroutine methodologies might be more appropriate, but they can be even harder to "get right" than threads -- and that's saying a lot. Basically, I'm suggesting that for most circumstances you should use threads by default, unless you can convince yourself that there are good reasons to go for something else. – Euro Micelli Oct 27 '09 at 2:25
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Threading means locking, whereas coroutines are naturally executed in order. Boom half your work is already done for you. Threads are good if you want to compute multiple heavy algorithms in parallel, I can't really think of any other reason to use them. I guess if there's some blocking API that has no non-blocking mode? – L̲̳o̲̳̳n̲̳̳g̲̳̳p̲̳o̲̳̳k̲̳̳e̲̳̳ Nov 23 '09 at 15:39
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@Longpoke, I don't agree that half your work is done for you with coroutines. You trade thinking about locks for having to split your algorithm. Different things. Sometimes coroutines are better, sometimes not. That's what i meant by consider threading. – Euro Micelli Jul 26 '10 at 0:26

WvCont is a part of WvStreams that implements so-called semi-coroutines. These are a little easier to handle than full-on coroutines: you call into it, and it yields back to the person who called it.

It's implemented using the more flexible WvTask, which supports full-on coroutines; you can find it in the same library.

Works on win32 and Linux, at least, and probably any other Unix system.

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For those who want to know how they may leverage Coroutines in a portable way in C++ you will have to wait for C++17. The standards committee is working on the feature see the N3722 paper. To summarize the current draft of the paper, instead of Async and Await, the keywords will be resumable, and await.

Take a look at the experimental implementation in Visual Studio 2015 to play with Microsoft's experimental implementation. It doesn't look like clang has a implementation yet.

There is a good talk from Cppcon Coroutines a negative overhead abstraction outline the benefits of using Coroutines in C++ and how it affects simplicity and performance of the code.

At present we still have to use library implementations, but in the near future, we will have coroutines as a core C++ feature.

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I've tried to implement coroutines myself using C++11 and threads:

#include <iostream>
#include <thread>

class InterruptedException : public std::exception {
};

class AsyncThread {
public:
    AsyncThread() {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(mutex);
        thread.reset(new std::thread(std::bind(&AsyncThread::run, this)));
        conditionVar.wait(lock); // wait for the thread to start
    }
    ~AsyncThread() {
        {
            std::lock_guard<std::mutex> _(mutex);
            quit = true;
        }
        conditionVar.notify_all();
        thread->join();
    }
    void run() {
        try {
            yield();
            for (int i = 0; i < 7; ++i) {
                std::cout << i << std::endl;
                yield();
            }
        } catch (InterruptedException& e) {
            return;
        }
        std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(mutex);
        quit = true;
        conditionVar.notify_all();
    }
    void yield() {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(mutex);
        conditionVar.notify_all();
        conditionVar.wait(lock);
        if (quit) {
            throw InterruptedException();
        }
    }
    void step() {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(mutex);
        if (!quit) {
            conditionVar.notify_all();
            conditionVar.wait(lock);
        }
    }
private:
    std::unique_ptr<std::thread> thread;
    std::condition_variable conditionVar;
    std::mutex mutex;
    bool quit = false;
};

int main() {
    AsyncThread asyncThread;
    for (int i = 0; i < 3; ++i) {
        std::cout << "main: " << i << std::endl;
        asyncThread.step();
    }
}
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Isn't this just a producer-consumer implementation? – André Caron Aug 14 '12 at 17:00

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