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After a painful debugging experience, I tracked down this issue: ScheduledThreadPool does not report if a task fails, and does not execute a task that failed once ever again. Therefore, it is hard to keep track of the liveness of periodic jobs, short of checking them with yet other periodic tasks (via dead man's switch or the ScheduledFuture).

Now we can hand a ScheduledThreadPool an UncaughtExceptionHandler, but not even that seems to work:

import java.util.concurrent.*;

class Test {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    final ThreadFactory tf = new ThreadFactory() {
      private final ThreadFactory delegate = Executors.defaultThreadFactory();

      @Override public Thread newThread(final Runnable r) {
        final Thread res = delegate.newThread(r);
        res.setUncaughtExceptionHandler(new Thread.UncaughtExceptionHandler() {
          @Override
          public void uncaughtException(final Thread t, final Throwable e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
          }
        });
        return res;
      }
    };
    final ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor exec = new ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor(1, tf);

    final Runnable task = new Runnable() {
      private int c = 0;

      @Override
      public void run() {
        if ( c++ == 5 ) {
          throw new ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException("Runtime error!");
        }

        System.out.println("Reached " + c);
      }
    };

    exec.scheduleWithFixedDelay(task, 1, 1, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
  }
}

The output of this program is simply (Oracle Java SE (64-Bit Server) 1.7.0_06-b24)

Reached 1
Reached 2
Reached 3
Reached 4
Reached 5

and then it hangs (by design).

I can always try-catch the whole task, but that feels ugly; the UncaughtExceptionHandler should do that already!

Is there an API-solution for this issue? Did I do something wrong, or is it a bug?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The currency thread pools capture all exceptions and place then in the Future object for you to inspect. UncaughtExceptionHandler is only for exception the thread doesn't catch and kills the thread, which in this case would only be for exception thrown by the thread pool code.

A simple way around this is to wrap your runnable.

public class ExceptionHandlingScheduledExecutor extends ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor {
    private final Thread.UncaughtExceptionHandler ueh;

    public ExceptionHandlingScheduledExecutor(int corePoolSize, Thread.UncaughtExceptionHandler ueh) {
        super(corePoolSize);
        this.ueh = ueh;
    }

    @Override
    public ScheduledFuture<?> schedule(Runnable command, long delay, TimeUnit unit) {
        return super.schedule(wrap(command), delay, unit);
    }

    @Override
    public <V> ScheduledFuture<V> schedule(Callable<V> callable, long delay, TimeUnit unit) {
        return super.schedule(wrap(callable), delay, unit); 
    }

    @Override
    public ScheduledFuture<?> scheduleAtFixedRate(Runnable command, long initialDelay, long period, TimeUnit unit) {
        return super.scheduleAtFixedRate(wrap(command), initialDelay, period, unit);
    }

    @Override
    public ScheduledFuture<?> scheduleWithFixedDelay(Runnable command, long initialDelay, long delay, TimeUnit unit) {
        return super.scheduleWithFixedDelay(wrap(command), initialDelay, delay, unit);
    }

    @Override
    public void execute(Runnable command) {
        super.execute(wrap(command));
    }

    @Override
    public Future<?> submit(Runnable task) {
        return super.submit(wrap(task));
    }

    @Override
    public <T> Future<T> submit(Runnable task, T result) {
        return super.submit(wrap(task), result);
    }

    @Override
    public <T> Future<T> submit(Callable<T> task) {
        return super.submit(wrap(task));
    }

    private Runnable wrap(final Runnable runnable) {
        return new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    runnable.run();
                } catch (final Throwable t) {
                    ueh.uncaughtException(Thread.currentThread(), t);
                    throw t;
                }
            }
        };
    }

    private <T> Callable<T> wrap(final Callable<T> callable) {
        return new Callable<T>() {
            @Override
            public T call() throws Exception {
                try {
                    return callable.call();
                } catch (Throwable t) {
                    ueh.uncaughtException(Thread.currentThread(), t);
                    throw t;
                }
            }
        };
    }
}

You can sub-class the ThreadPoolExecutor to do this transparently.


You can also use a cached thread pool to handle exception but this is is more complicated.

One way to use the returned Future in a transparent way is to sub-class ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor (or any Executor, for that matter):

class MyScheduledExecutor extends ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor {
  private final Thread.UncaughtExceptionHandler ueh;
  private final ExecutorService futureService = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();

  public MyScheduledExecutor(int corePoolSize, Thread.UncaughtExceptionHandler ueh) {
    super(corePoolSize);
    this.ueh = ueh;
  }

  // Copy other constructors

  @Override
  public ScheduledFuture<?> scheduleWithFixedDelay(Runnable command,
                                                   long initialDelay,
                                                   long delay,
                                                   TimeUnit unit) {
    final ScheduledFuture<?> f = super.scheduleWithFixedDelay(command, initialDelay, delay, unit);
    futureService.submit(new Runnable() {
      @Override
      public void run() {
        try {
          f.get();
        } catch (Throwable t ) {
          ueh.uncaughtException(null, t.getCause());
        }
      }
    };

    return f;
  }

  // Do similarly for other submit/schedule methods
}

And use it like this:

final ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor exec = new MyScheduledExecutor(1, new Thread.UncaughtExceptionHandler() {
      @Override
      public void uncaughtException(final Thread t, final Throwable e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
      }
    });

Now the output is as desired:

Reached 1
Reached 2
Reached 3
Reached 4
Reached 5
java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException: Runtime error!
   ...
share|improve this answer
    
AFAIK, The API is designed to use the Future to capture Exceptions. That's the way to do it. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 29 '12 at 12:25
    
About the version with the cached ThreadPool: how does this treat blocking tasks? The interface doesn't say. We would not want to have such "report tasks" wait in some queue only because all threads are waiting (we want to report the original error as timely as possible). –  Raphael Aug 29 '12 at 14:59
    
The Cached Thread Pool uses a SynchronousQueue or a queue of zero length and it creates as many Threads as needed, but it also recycles free ones. The most timely way to deal with errors is to handle them in the thread which created them, and this doesn't require additional threads. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Aug 29 '12 at 15:01
    
Ah, it's not a fixed-size thread pool. facepalm –  Raphael Aug 29 '12 at 15:03

You can subclass ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor and override the afterExecute(Runnable,Throwable) method. you can handle uncaught exceptions there as you see fit.

Typically, in a similar fashion to what @PeterLawrey described above, any tasks which i expect to run in the background (where i won't be tracking the Future) i will wrap with a try{}catch(Throwable){} block and handle exceptions which escape the working code itself.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, that's nice! Too bad you have to subclass, anyway, but that's probably the most "as intended" solution. –  Raphael Aug 29 '12 at 15:05
2  
Note that you can't directly use the throwable there, as the doc say: "A consequence of the use of ScheduledFuture objects is that afterExecute is always called with a null second Throwable argument, even if the command terminated abruptly. Instead, the Throwable thrown by such a task can be obtained via Future.get()." –  Zitrax Oct 22 '13 at 8:28

You can use VerboseRunnable class from jcabi-log, which does the wrapping suggested above:

import com.jcabi.log.VerboseRunnable;
Runnable runnable = new VerboseRunnable(
  Runnable() {
    public void run() { 
      // do business logic, may Exception occurs
    }
  },
  true // it means that all exceptions will be swallowed and logged
);

Now, when executor calls runnable.run() no exceptions are thrown. Instead, they are swallowed and logged (to SLF4J). Thus, the executor won't stop because of exception and you will see what's going on.

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