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I have been building ASP.NET MVC application and I'm worried about potential multi-threading issues when I launch it. One particular concern is the following code:

private static IDictionary<string, ISettings> _settingsDictionary = new Dictionary<string, ISettings>();

public T Settings<T>() where T : ISettings, new() {
    var key = typeof(T).FullName;

    if (!_settingsDictionary.ContainsKey(key))
        _settingsDictionary[key] = _settingsService.GetSettings<T>();

    return (T)_settingsDictionary[key];
}

Notice the dictionary is defined as static. This allows me to cache the dictionary so that it returns the same instance for every request for the length of the application.

This works fine when testing locally but i'm worried it may suffer when used by hundreds of users. This has led me to investigate the ConcurrencyDictionary. Please could you advise me on whether I need to use it and how i would go about doing so if that is the case.

Thanks

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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes there is a potential data race here:

if (!_settingsDictionary.ContainsKey(key))
    _settingsDictionary[key] = _settingsService.GetSettings<T>();

which could cause two threads to add the same key, since they can be interrupted at any point.

You could use ConcurrentDictionary.GetOrAdd instead:

private static ConcurrentDictionary<string, ISettings> _settingsDictionary = new ConcurrentDictionary<string, ISettings>();

public T Settings<T>() where T : ISettings, new() {
    var key = typeof(T).FullName;

    return _settingsDictionary.GetOrAdd(key, _settingsService.GetSettings<T>());
}

Edit: Since you don't want _settingsService.GetSettings<T>() to be executed every time, an alternative could be:

private static IDictionary<string, ISettings> _settingsDictionary = new Dictionary<string, ISettings>();
private static object locker = new object();

public T Settings<T>() where T : ISettings, new() {
    var key = typeof(T).FullName;
    lock(locker) 
    {
        if (!_settingsDictionary.ContainsKey(key))
            _settingsDictionary[key] = _settingsService.GetSettings<T>();

        return (T)_settingsDictionary[key];
    }
}
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Thanks for your answer. I've just tried it and did some debugging by putting a breakpoint inside the GetSettings method. However I found that it always hits the breakpoint even when an item exists in the dictionary. –  nfplee Aug 29 '12 at 11:25
    
@nfplee: It's because it needs to first evaluate the parameters before calling GetOrAdd, so it will call GetSettings, but do nothing with the result in case the key exists. –  Tudor Aug 29 '12 at 11:29
    
How is that any better than just saying: return _settingsService.GetSettings<T>();? –  nfplee Aug 29 '12 at 11:47
    
@nfplee: Then how are you adding the value to the dictionary? –  Tudor Aug 29 '12 at 11:48
    
I mean compared to my original example (in the question). The example in the question only hits GetSettings if an item doesn't exist in the dictionary. GetSettings hits the database which I wish to avoid repeating. –  nfplee Aug 29 '12 at 11:50
show 3 more comments

Yes, there's a race because if there is no key found at:

if (!_settingsDictionary.ContainsKey(key))

Then by the time we run:

_settingsDictionary[key] = _settingsService.GetSettings<T>();

There might be a key.

It's even worse than just replacing needlessly though. If thread 1 adding a key requires a resize, then it might be part-way through when thread 2 adds and it's deemed to require a resize, and pretty much all bets are off for any further use of that dictionary.

The important question is, "Is this a case where we will have periods of lots of threads simultaneously hitting the dictionary, or is this a case where that will be rare but we need to guard against it?"

In the first case, use ConcurrentDictionary. In the second case, just add a lock to your current code. ConcurrentDictionary gives better performance in the face of concurrency (as one would expect from the name), but a lock around a normal dictionary is better when there's normally only one thread that actually hits it, but the occasional concurrent call is possible.

Alternative to both, if the number of possible settings is low, just load the lot in at the beginning. Dictionaries are safe for multiple readers if there's no more writing, and that'd be fastest of all with zero locking.

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Good points, but what I don't get is, in case the accesses are rare, does it make any difference if you use ConcurrentDictionary or lock, since the overhead will be negligible in any case? –  Tudor Aug 29 '12 at 11:18
    
@Tudor, if matters if one thread does a bunch of repeated calls, but its rare for several threads to be in that position. I'll add now though, that as projects evolve its more common to end up with greater concurrency than less, except when you actively work to reduce the concurrent strain on a component, so if in doubt go with ConcurrentDictionary. –  Jon Hanna Aug 29 '12 at 11:20
    
Hi, thanks for your advice. I have accepted Tudor's answer as it provided an example. –  nfplee Aug 29 '12 at 11:58
    
NP. Tudor's is the best, I'm just adding some extra info. –  Jon Hanna Aug 29 '12 at 12:09
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