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I'm new to python, and it really confused me.

I want to write something like

class line :
    points = []

    def add(self, point) :
        self.points.append(point)

line1 = line()
line2 = line()
line1.add("Some point")
print line2.points

Output: ['Some point']

And the result is like they refers to the same list.
But I do want a object member not a class member.

And I tried, if points is int, or some other simple type it works fine.

Besides, I know if I write

def __init__(self) :
    self.points = []

it will also work, but I don't get why they are pointing to same list by default.

ps. I know writing a init will work.

class line :
    name = "abc"

    def changename(self, name) :
        self.name = name

line1 = line()
line2 = line()
line1.changename(123)
print line2.name

But the code above output "abc"

So I don't understand why same kind of declaration act different by type.

share|improve this question
    
This is a very common question, and a bit tricky to wrap your head around. here's another question asked yesterday to the same effect. Perhaps another few explanations will help solidify the concept. –  mgilson Aug 29 '12 at 11:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Because in this case

class line :
    points = []

points is a class member. It belongs to the class, and since line1 and line2 are of the same class, points is the same list.

So you are right in using

def __init__(self) :
    self.points = []

instead to create an instance member which is tied to the instance, not the class.

To answer your edit

If you write:

def changename(self, name) :
    self.name = name

you override your class member and create a new instance member using self.name = name.

To get back to your first example, it would be like writing:

def add(self, point) :
    self.points = self.points + [point]
share|improve this answer
    
But if points is not a list object, say it is a string or int then it will not become a class member? –  silvesthu Aug 29 '12 at 11:08
    
@silvesthu It will become. –  applicative_functor Aug 29 '12 at 11:10
    
@black_dragon I added another sample in the question. If it is a string, it don't become a class member. –  silvesthu Aug 29 '12 at 11:13
    
@silvesthu Yes, it does. But you just overrite it with an instance member. See my update. –  sloth Aug 29 '12 at 11:20
    
@BigYellowCactus Thank you so much. –  silvesthu Aug 29 '12 at 11:21

The first syntax:

class line :
    points = []

makes points a class attribute. Therefore, it will be shared between all instances of the class.

To make sure that an attribute belongs to a class, you should do as follows:

class line(object) :
    def __init__(self):
        self.points = []

i.e., creating the attributed only in __init__, when a new instance is created.

share|improve this answer

As others have already explained, and as you apparently already understand, the following creates a class attribute, shared by every instance:

class line:
    points = []

When you reference this attribute in your code, Python attempts to find it the current scope, and then follows the enclosing scopes. So if you call self.points.append(), you are indeed changing the points class attribute.

When you assign to self.points in your code, you are defining a new points instance attribute. So in your second example when points is a string, the changename function actually creates a new instance attribute when called.

You can try the following:

print line.name  # prints the class attribute
print line1.name # prints the class attribute
print line2.name # prints the instance attribute

You will notice that calling changename did create a new instance attribute, while the class attribute is left unchanged. As changename was never called on line1, a reference to its name will resolve to the line class attribute.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your explanation. Mostly I use C++/Java so it took me a while to understand the "replace a attribute". I think I understand it now. –  silvesthu Aug 29 '12 at 11:26

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