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It seems that MySQL doesn't have array variables. What should I use instead?

There seem to be two alternatives suggested: A set-type scalar and temporary tables. The question I linked to suggests the former. But is it good practice to use these instead of array variables? Alternatively, if I go with sets, what would be the set-based idiom equivalent to foreach?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Well, I've been using temporary tables instead of array variables. Not the greatest solution, but it works.

Note that you don't need to formally define their fields, just create them using a SELECT:

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE IF NOT EXISTS my_temp_table
SELECT * FROM people WHERE last_name = 'Smith';

(See also Create temporary table from select statement without using Create Table.)

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You can achieve this in MySQL using WHILE loop:

SET @myArrayOfValue = '2,5,2,23,6,';

WHILE (LOCATE(',', @myArrayOfValue) > 0)
DO
    SET @value = ELT(1, @myArrayOfValue);
    SET @value = SUBSTRING(@myArrayOfValue, LOCATE(',',@myArrayOfValue) + 1);

    INSERT INTO `EXEMPLE` VALUES(@value, 'hello');
END WHILE;

EDIT: Alternatively you can do it using UNION ALL:

INSERT INTO `EXEMPLE`
(
 `value`, `message`
)
(
 SELECT 2 AS `value`, 'hello' AS `message`
 UNION ALL
 SELECT 5 AS `value`, 'hello' AS `message`
 UNION ALL
 SELECT 2 AS `value`, 'hello' AS `message`
 UNION ALL
 ...
);
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Aren't loops possible only in stored procedures? –  einpoklum Aug 29 '12 at 11:32
    
yes right, its possible inside stored procedures, functions and triggers. –  Omesh Aug 29 '12 at 11:36
    
So I can't use the code you provided... I need something that's applicable more generally. –  einpoklum Aug 29 '12 at 11:48
    
You can write a sample stored procedure and CALL it. –  Omesh Aug 29 '12 at 12:35
    
But that's only for fixed code using the array. –  einpoklum Aug 30 '12 at 6:46

Dont know about the arrays, but there is a way to store comma-separated lists in normal VARCHAR column.

And when you need to find something in that list you can use the FIND_IN_SET() function.

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If i want to find subset in a set, is there any way? –  Akshay Vishnoi Apr 29 '13 at 11:31
    
Sorry! I'm not sure it is possible. –  wormhit Apr 30 '13 at 15:36

Maybe create a temporary memory table with columns (key, value) if you want associative arrays. Having a memory table is the closest thing to having arrays in mysql

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Umm, I don't want associative arrays, just arrays. –  einpoklum Aug 1 '13 at 13:25
    
you can use a temporary memory table with only one column and then loop thru the values using cursors, that is the closest thing to using arrays and for/while loops in a non-declarative programming language –  Pavle Lekic Aug 2 '13 at 15:09
    
The language actually has this feature, i.e., there's no syntactic reason you shouldn't be able to select a vector into a variable just like you select a scalar into it. –  einpoklum Aug 2 '13 at 18:30

This works fine for list of values:

SET @myArrayOfValue = '2,5,2,23,6,';

WHILE (LOCATE(',', @myArrayOfValue) > 0)
DO
SET @value = ELT(1, @myArrayOfValue);
    SET @STR = SUBSTRING(@myArrayOfValue, 1, LOCATE(',',@myArrayOfValue)-1);
    SET @myArrayOfValue = SUBSTRING(@myArrayOfValue, LOCATE(',', @myArrayOfValue) + 1);

    INSERT INTO `Demo` VALUES(@STR, 'hello');
END WHILE;
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Both versions using sets didn't work for me (tested with MySQL 5.5). The function ELT() returns the whole set. Considering the WHILE statement is only avaible in PROCEDURE context i added it to my solution:

DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS __main__;

DELIMITER $
CREATE PROCEDURE __main__()
BEGIN
    SET @myArrayOfValue = '2,5,2,23,6,';

    WHILE (LOCATE(',', @myArrayOfValue) > 0)
    DO
        SET @value = LEFT(@myArrayOfValue, LOCATE(',',@myArrayOfValue) - 1);    
        SET @myArrayOfValue = SUBSTRING(@myArrayOfValue, LOCATE(',',@myArrayOfValue) + 1);
    END WHILE;
END;
$
DELIMITER ;

CALL __main__;

To be honest, i don't think this is a good practice. Even if its realy necessary, this is barely readable and quite slow.

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I Think I can improve on this answer. Try this:

The parameter 'Pranks' is a CSV. ie. '1,2,3,4.....etc'

CREATE PROCEDURE AddRanks(
IN Pranks TEXT
)
BEGIN
  DECLARE VCounter INTEGER;
  DECLARE VStringToAdd VARCHAR(50);
  SET VCounter = 0;
  START TRANSACTION;
  REPEAT
    SET VStringToAdd = (SELECT TRIM(SUBSTRING_INDEX(Pranks, ',', 1)));
    SET Pranks = (SELECT RIGHT(Pranks, TRIM(LENGTH(Pranks) - LENGTH(SUBSTRING_INDEX(Pranks, ',', 1))-1)));
    INSERT INTO tbl_rank_names(rank)
    VALUES(VStringToAdd);
    SET VCounter = VCounter + 1;
  UNTIL (Pranks = '')
  END REPEAT;
  SELECT VCounter AS 'Records added';
  COMMIT;
END;

This method makes the searched string of CSV values progressively shorter with each iteration of the loop, which I believe would be better for optimization.

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What is 'this answer' you're referring to? Also, you don't get to have a CSV file. –  einpoklum Dec 26 '13 at 13:35

Have you tried using PHP's serialize()? That allows you to store the contents of a variable's array in a string PHP understands and is safe for the database (assuming you've escaped it first).

$array = array(
    1 => 'some data',
    2 => 'some more'
);

//Assuming you're already connected to the database
$sql = sprintf("INSERT INTO `yourTable` (`rowID`, `rowContent`) VALUES (NULL, '%s')"
     ,  serialize(mysql_real_escape_string($array, $dbConnection)));
mysql_query($sql, $dbConnection) or die(mysql_error());

You can also do the exact same without a numbered array

$array2 = array(
    'something' => 'something else'
);

or

$array3 = array(
    'somethingNew'
);
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4  
I'm not working with PHP, so that's not really relevant for me. –  einpoklum Mar 23 '13 at 21:36

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