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I'm using simple script to automate ftp. The script looks like this:

ftp -nv $FTP_HOST<<END_FTP
user $FTP_USER $FTP_PASS
binary
mkdir $REMOTE_DIR
cd $REMOTE_DIR
lcd $LOCAL
put $FILE
bye
END_FTP

But I would like to pipe STDERR to the syslog and STDOUT to a logfile. Normally I would do something like that: ftp -nv $FTP_HOST 1>>ftp.log | logger<<END_FTP but in this case that won't work because of <<END_FTP. How should I do it properly to make the script work? Note that I want to redirect only output from the FTP command inside my script and not the whole script.

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1  
The here-document input redirection belongs with the ftp command (before the | symbol), and is a word that can be moved around on the line; it does not have to be the last part of the command line (though it very often is the last item on the line). You could put nothing after the |, in which case the lines following are the here document, and the (non-empty) line after the end marker for the here-document is the command that is executed as the RHS of the pipe. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 29 '12 at 19:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This works without using a temp file for the error output. The 2>&1 sends the error output to where standard output is going — which is the pipe. The >> changes where standard output is going — which is now the file — without changing where standard error is going. So, the errors go to logger and the output to ftp.log.

ftp -nv $FTPHOST <<END_FTP 2>&1 >> ftp.log | logger
user $FTP_USER $FTP_PASS
binary
mkdir $REMOTE_DIR
cd $REMOTE_DIR
lcd $LOCAL
put $FILE
bye
END_FTP
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2  
ftp -nv $FTPHOST <<END_FTP 2>&1 >> ftp.log | logger should get rid of the temp file. –  chepner Aug 29 '12 at 13:51
    
@SiliconMind Don't put the edit message into the body of the post. That's what the edit summary box is for. –  meagar Aug 29 '12 at 19:30
    
@SiliconMind, the OP says: STDERR to the syslog and STDOUT to a logfile. The 2>&1 solution is not complete. –  perreal Aug 29 '12 at 19:33

How about:

 exec > mylogfile; exec 2> >(logger -t myftpscript)

in front of you ftp script

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Note that I want to redirect only output from the FTP command inside my script and not the whole script. I've posted only part of the script that handles ftp upload. The whole script does a little more than that. –  SiliconMind Aug 29 '12 at 13:07
    
Then reset the redirections after your ftp commands, something like exec >/dev/tty 2>&1 –  Stephane Rouberol Aug 29 '12 at 13:12
    
The 'exec to do I/O redirection' technique is useful in its place, and it is a useful technique to know about. It is not clear that this is its place, though; having to undo it makes it less plausible when it can all be done with 'temporary' redirections on the specific command line. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 29 '12 at 19:44

Another way of doing this I/O redirection is with the { ... } operations, thus:

{
ftp -nv $FTPHOST <<END_FTP >> ftp.log
user $FTP_USER $FTP_PASS
binary
mkdir $REMOTE_DIR
cd $REMOTE_DIR
lcd $LOCAL
put $FILE
bye
END_FTP
# Optionally other commands here...stderr will go to logger too
} 2>&1 | logger

This is often the best mechanism when more than one command, but not all commands, need the same I/O redirection.

In context, though, I think this solution is the best (but that's someone else's answer, not mine):

ftp -nv $FTPHOST <<END_FTP 2>&1 >> ftp.log | logger
...
END_FTP
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Why not create a netrc file and let that do your login and put the file for you.

The netrc file will let you login and allow you to define an init macro that will make the needed directory and put the file you want over there. Most ftp commands let you specify which netrc file you'd like to use, so you could use various netrc files for various purposes.

Here's an example netrc file called my_netrc:

machine ftp_host
user ftp_user
password swordfish
macrodef init
binary
mkdir my_dir
cd my_dir
put my_file
bye

Then, you could do this:

$ ftp -v -Nmy_netrc $FTPHOST 2>&1 >> ftp.log | logger
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