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The problem is when I set the background color of the square JPanel as square.setBackground(colors[j]) the square draws only the first color of the list of colors without displaying the other 3. This is my code:

import java.awt.*;
import java.util.*;
import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.*;

@SuppressWarnings({ "unused", "serial" })

public class RegionPartition extends JFrame
{
    JLayeredPane layeredPane;
    JPanel regionBoard;
    JLabel regionPiece;

    private static int DELAY = 200;

    private Color[] colors = new Color[]{Color.PINK, Color.GREEN, Color.BLACK, Color.RED};

    public RegionPartition()
    {
        Dimension boardSize = new Dimension(500, 500);

        //  Use a Layered Pane for this this application
        layeredPane = new JLayeredPane();
        getContentPane().add(layeredPane);
        layeredPane.setPreferredSize(boardSize);

        regionBoard = new JPanel();

        layeredPane.add(regionBoard, JLayeredPane.DEFAULT_LAYER);

        regionBoard.setLayout( new GridLayout(4, 4) );

        regionBoard.setPreferredSize( boardSize );
        regionBoard.setBounds(0, 0, boardSize.width, boardSize.height);

        Random random = new Random();


        for (int i = 0; i < 16; i++) {          
            JPanel square = new JPanel(new BorderLayout());
            square.setBorder(BorderFactory.createLineBorder(Color.black));
            regionBoard.add( square );  

            square.setBackground(Color.green);

            int j=0;

            square.setBackground(colors[j]);

            j++;
        }
    }

    {
        JPanel panel = new JPanel()  
        {  
            Clients[] c = new Clients[128];

            Random random = new Random();

            private final int SIZE = 450;
            private int DELAY = 9999999;
            public void paintComponent (Graphics g)
            {
                super.paintComponent(g);

                for (int i=0; i<c.length; i++)
                {
                    int x = ( int ) ( random.nextFloat() * SIZE ) + 10;
                    int y = ( int ) ( random.nextFloat() * SIZE ) + 10;

                    g.drawOval( x, y, 10, 10 );
                    g.fillOval(x, y, 10, 10);
                }

                for (int j=0; j<DELAY; j++)
                {
                    repaint();
                }
            }
        };  

        panel.setOpaque(false);  

        //Set the glass pane in the JFrame  
        setGlassPane(panel);  

        //Display the panel  

        panel.setVisible(true);  
    }

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        JFrame frame = new RegionPartition();

        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE );
        frame.pack();
        frame.setResizable(true);
        frame.setLocationRelativeTo( null );
        frame.setVisible(true);

    }

    protected void paintComponent(Graphics g)
    {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    }
}
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3  
Extra spacing between every row doesn't help readability, indentation does! j is always set to 0 right before you set the color... –  Jacob Raihle Aug 29 '12 at 13:03
1  
Btw: You should never call repaint() inside the paintComponent() method (this will result in your component being painted over and over). Moreover, it is useless to call several times repaint() (you call it 200 times with your loop) because they are coalesced into a single call. –  Guillaume Polet Aug 29 '12 at 13:25
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3 Answers 3

That is because you are always setting j to 0 on each iteration:

    int j=0;

    square.setBackground(colors[j]);

    j++;

you may want to change j for an i or do a nested loop, that depends on what you really want to do here.

If you want to make all 16 squares have all four colors in a grid like manner, you might want to change your loop to something like:

     for (int i = 0; i < 16; i++) {          
        JPanel square = new JPanel(new GridLayout(2,2));
        square.setBorder(BorderFactory.createLineBorder(Color.black));
        regionBoard.add( square );  



        for(int j=0; j<4; ++j){
          JPanel insideSquare = new JPanel();
          insideSquare.setBackground(colors[j]);
          square.add(insideSquare);
        }
    }
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I want to change the backgroung color of the JPanel square. The thing is that even when I'm using a for loop it draws only one of the colors of the array Color and specificaly in this case it draws only the last color of the array! What do you mean by changing it to i?? –  user1633202 Aug 29 '12 at 13:10
1  
@user1633202 "it draws only one of the colors of the array Color and specificaly in this case it draws only the last color" That's because JPanels can only have one background color, you're overwriting it each time. –  Jacob Raihle Aug 29 '12 at 13:13
1  
You should also use the modulo ('%') operator because there are only 4 colors in the array, but the loop is repeated 16 times –  Guillaume Polet Aug 29 '12 at 13:27
    
By changing colors[j] for colors[i] will paint every one of the panels to one of the colors of the array as a 1:1 mapping that is if you have 16 colors –  Sednus Aug 29 '12 at 13:28
1  
If the goal is to simply paint a 2x2 grid, there's no reason to use several JPanels. It'd be far more clean and conventional to simply override paintComponent in the one panel and then partition it's size to the four equal squares to color. –  Vulcan Aug 29 '12 at 18:18
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Because you only have 4 colors in your color array, but your loop index exceeds this, you could use:

square.setBackground(colors[ i % colors.length]);

to alternate the colors of your squares.

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You are instantiating int j within the scope of your for loop, so its value is not preserved across multiple iterations. You should declare it at a point in your code to allow it scope over your entire for loop.

int j = 0;
<for loop>
    square.setBackground(colors[j]);
    j++;
<end for>

However, your j is serving the purpose of i in this situation, where i is sufficient as an array index. It would be more correct to remove j entirely and instead do the following:

    square.setBackground(colors[i]);
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I did as you suggested but I'm having compile errors: Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException: 4 at RegionPartition.<init>(RegionPartition.java:55) at RegionPartition.main(RegionPartition.java:109) –  user1633202 Aug 29 '12 at 13:17
    
That is a runtime error, not a syntax error. Anyway, that would have occurred had you implemented int j correctly, so I must what your goal is with the colors. –  Vulcan Aug 29 '12 at 13:22
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