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I want to dynamically create a %detail hash, without using an eval statement. This code is working fine with an eval statement, but is there any better way to perform this without using eval?

my @input=('INFO: Vikram 32 2012','SAL: 12000$','ADDRESS: 54, junk, JUNK');

my %matching_hash= (
                    qr/^INFO:\s*(\S+)\s+(\S+)\s+(\S+)/ =>['name','age','joining'],
                    qr/^SAL:\s*(\S+)/ => ['salary'],
                    qr/ADDRESS:\s*(.*)/ =>['address']
                    );
my %detail;
while(my ($regex, $array) = each(%matching_hash)) {
    foreach (@input){
        if(/$regex/) {
            for(my $i=0;$i<=$#$array; $i++) {
                $j=$i+1;
                eval '$detail{$array->[$i]} = $$j';
            }
        }
    }
}
use Data::Dumper;

print Dumper(\%detail);
++++++++++++++

$VAR1 = {
          'name' => 'Vikram',
          'address' => '54, junk, JUNK',
          'age' => '32',
          'joining' => '2012',
          'salary' => '12000$'
        };
share|improve this question
    
I don't think your eval statement will work if you use strict (I had to remove it from my test to get the desired output). –  Jonah Bishop Aug 29 '12 at 13:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Change the for loop:

for(my $i=0;$i<=$#$array; $i++) {
    $j=$i+1;
    eval '$detail{$array->[$i]} = $$j';
}

by:

@detail{@{$array}} = ($_ =~ $regex);
share|improve this answer

Relevant part:

if(my @m = /$regex/) {
  for(my $i=0;$i<=$#$array; $i++) {
      $detail{$array->[$i]} = $m[$i];              
  }   
}   
share|improve this answer

If you can use lastest version of Perl, see to this notation (?<name>...) in regexp perlre docs It's more clear then using $1, $2, $3 etc.

SCRIPT

use v5.14;
use Data::Dumper;

my @inputs = ( 'INFO: Vikram 32 2012', 'SAL: 12000$','ADDRESS: 54, junk, JUNK' );

my %matching_hash= (
    qr/^INFO:\s*(?<name>\S+)\s+(?<age>\S+)\s+(?<joining>\S+)/ => [ 'name', 'age', 'joining' ],
    qr/^SAL:\s*(?<salary>\S+)/                                => [ 'salary' ],
    qr/ADDRESS:\s*(?<address>.*)/                             => [ 'address' ],
);

my %detail;
while (my ($regex, $array) = each %matching_hash ) {

    INPUT:
    foreach my $input ( @inputs ) {

        next INPUT if not $input =~ m{$regex};

        for my $name ( @$array ) {
            $detail{$name} = $+{$name};
        }
    }
}

say Dumper( \%detail);   

OUTPUT

$VAR1 = {
          'name'    => 'Vikram',
          'address' => '54, junk, JUNK',
          'age'     => '32',
          'joining' => '2012',
          'salary'  => '12000$'
        };
share|improve this answer
2  
He shouldn't need the mapped arrays if he's going to use named matches just @detail{ keys %+ } = values %+ if $input =~ m{$regex}; or even %detail = %+ if $input =~ m{$regex};. Then you could put the regexes into a structure that is much more fitting for iteration, a list/array. +1 for what I would have suggested. –  Axeman Aug 29 '12 at 14:14
    
%detail = %+ if $input =~ m{$regex}; wouldn't work, it throws away what is already in %detail. –  Brad Gilbert Aug 30 '12 at 1:18

You can use the two arrays @LAST_MATCH_START and @LAST_MATCH_END (see perldoc perlvar) together with substr instead of $1, $2.... Something similar to

$detail{ $array->[$i] } = substr $_, $LAST_MATCH_START[$j], $LAST_MATCH_END[$j] - $LAST_MATCH_START[$j];
share|improve this answer
    
Agreed, except for the English. –  hobbs Aug 29 '12 at 16:31

Using named capture groups, you can eliminate the need for %matching_hash to be a hash. While at the same time eliminating the need to use the number variables, or assigning the result of the match in an array. This is because it will store the relevant information into %+.

use 5.10.1;

my @match = (
  qr'^INFO:\s*(?<name>\S+)\s+(?<age>\S+)\s+(?<joining>\S+)',
  qr'^SAL:\s*(?<salary>\S+)',
  qr'ADDRESS:\s*(?<address>.*)',
);

sub get_details{
  my %detail;

  for my $input ( @_ ) {
    for my $match ( @match ){
      next unless $input =~ $match;
      @detail{keys %+} = values %+;
      last;
    }
  }

  return \%detail;
}

use Data::Dumper;
my @inputs = ( 'INFO: Vikram 32 2012', 'SAL: 12000$','ADDRESS: 54, junk, JUNK' );
say Dumper get_details @inputs

It can get even simpler if you combine your qr's into one.

use 5.10.1;

my $match= qr"
    ^INFO:   \s* (?<name>\S+) \s+ (?<age>\S+) \s+ (?<joining>\S+)
  | ^SAL:    \s* (?<salary>\S+)
  | ADDRESS: \s* (?<address>.*)
"x;

sub get_details{
  my %detail;

  for my $input ( @_ ) {
    $input =~ $match;
    @detail{keys %+} = values %+;
  }

  return \%detail;
}

use Data::Dumper;
my @inputs = ( 'INFO: Vikram 32 2012', 'SAL: 12000$','ADDRESS: 54, junk, JUNK' );
say Dumper get_details @inputs
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