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I was asked this question in an interview

I was supposed to reverse the array of character in its own place not to reverse the whole array of character.

if

  char *ch="krishna is the best";

then I was supposed to reverse in such a way that the output should be like

   anhsirk si eht tseb

I could not write the code in Interview .Can anyone suggest me how to write to do this.?

Can it be done with the help of pointers ?

if the interviewer had not told me to reverse it to its own place then would if be easy to deal with using another array of character of array,which would have the new character string after reversing it?

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This is a very complex problem. Is the datatype in the array limited to just being a char? –  Richard J. Ross III Aug 29 '12 at 13:17
    
Are you saying that you can't use intermediary data structures? –  Lee Taylor Aug 29 '12 at 13:18
    
yes this is the specific casa to deal with. –  kTiwari Aug 29 '12 at 13:18
    
you can use any datastructure. –  kTiwari Aug 29 '12 at 13:27
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9 Answers 9

up vote 2 down vote accepted
 char *ch="krishna is the best";

No can do, this is a pointer to a read-only string literal. Let us imagine that your interviewer knew C and wrote this instead:

char str[]="krishna is the best";

Then you could do something like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <ctype.h>

char* str_reverse_word (char* str)
{
  char* begin;
  char* end;
  char* the_end;
  char  tmp;

  while(isspace(*str)) /* remove leading spaces from the string*/
  {
    str++;
  }

  begin = str;
  end = str;


  while(!isspace(*end) && *end != '\0') /* find the end of the sub string */
  {
    end++;
  }
  the_end = end; /* save this location and return it later */
  end--; /* move back 1 step to point at the last valid character */


  while(begin < end)
  {
    tmp = *begin;
    *begin = *end;
    *end = tmp;

    begin++;
    end--;
  }

  return the_end;
}

void str_reverse_sentence (char* str)
{
  do
  {
    str = str_reverse_word(str);
  } while (*str != '\0');
}

int main (void)
{
  char str[]="krishna is the best";
  str_reverse_sentence (str);
  puts(str);
}
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+1 code runs successfully .....but quite difficult to understand me because i'm new c programr –  kTiwari Aug 29 '12 at 13:53
    
@krishnaChandra You should learn about how arrays and pointers work in C before moving on to string handling. As for the isspace function (found in ctype.h), it only checks if a character is a space, line feed, new line or similar. –  Lundin Aug 29 '12 at 13:59
    
As said above in the comments to @anonymous's post, ch is not required by the standard to be read-only, it could very well be writable, but the result is undefined. There is a large difference there, that should be noted. Just saying that a string literal is read-only is invalid to say the least. –  Richard J. Ross III Aug 29 '12 at 14:07
    
@RichardJ.RossIII Attempting to modify a string literal is undefined behavior (C11 6.4.5), hence the "no can do". I felt no further need to post yet another answer explaining this, as there were already numerous such answers present. –  Lundin Aug 30 '12 at 15:01
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Neither your interviewer can write a code for that.

char *ch="krishna is the best"; 

you cant change data in readonly part of memory and ch points to a read only memory.

Update:- An Excerpt from N1548 (§6.7.9)

EXAMPLE 8
The declaration
char s[] = "abc", t[3] = "abc";
defines ‘‘plain’’ char array objects s and t whose elements are initialized with character string literals.
This declaration is identical to
char s[] = { 'a', 'b', 'c', '\0' }, t[] = { 'a', 'b', 'c' };
The contents of the arrays are modifiable.

On the other hand, the declaration
char *p = "abc";
defines p with type ‘‘pointer to char’’ and initializes it to point to an object with type ‘‘array of char’’ with length 4 whose elements are initialized with a character string literal. If an attempt is made to use p to modify the contents of the array, the behavior is undefined.

You can see applying swapping on such data type is dangerous.

It is suggested to write code as:-

char ch[]="krishna is the best"; and then apply an XOR swap at every encounter of a space character.

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2  
The above code is completely compiler dependent, ch is not guaranteed to be in read-only memory. –  Richard J. Ross III Aug 29 '12 at 13:19
    
@downvoter:- reason????? –  perilbrain Aug 29 '12 at 13:19
    
the same reason I just quoted above. ch is not guaranteed to be in read only memory, it's quite possible that it's writable. –  Richard J. Ross III Aug 29 '12 at 13:25
1  
The behavior is undefined; yes, it will vary based on the compiler, but if you're working with a compiler where string literals are in read-only memory then you cannot reverse the string (or substrings) in place. –  John Bode Aug 29 '12 at 13:33
    
@JohnBode:- was searching if something been mentioned about it in the standards.still no clue.However external sites strongly favour it. I'll update once I find about its real behaviour. :) –  perilbrain Aug 29 '12 at 13:36
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This doesn't sound too hard, if I understand it properly. Pseudocode:

let p = ch
while *p != '\0'
  while *p is whitespace
    ++p
  let q = last word character starting from p
  reverse the bytes between p and q
  let p = q + 1

The reversal of a range of bytes is trivial once you have pointers to the start and end. Just loop over half the distance, and swap the bytes.

Of course, as pointed out elsewhere, I assume that the buffer in ch is actually modifiable, which requires a change in the code you showed.

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You can reverse it word-by-word.

Just read the string till ' '(space) ie. you will get krishna and reverse this string and continue reading original string till another ' '(space) and keep reversing the string.

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if I would use strrev after reaching at space ,then the reverse will have severe output becoz before k there is not any \o null character. –  kTiwari Aug 29 '12 at 13:30
    
@krishnaChandra there is no standard function (nor POSIX function) named strrev, so you are in trouble there. –  Richard J. Ross III Aug 29 '12 at 13:36
    
taking about string reverse function of string.h –  kTiwari Aug 29 '12 at 13:39
    
when you reach till space just reverse the varible. If at i postion you get space assign j = i and start reversing using j till j>=0. –  Sachin Mhetre Aug 29 '12 at 13:43
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Does the string really have to be reversed in place, or is it just the output that has to be reversed?

If the former, then you have a problem. If the declaration really is

char *ch = "krishna is the best";

then you're attempting to modify a string literal, and the behavior upon attempting to modify a string literal is undefined. If you're working on a platform where string literals are stored in read-only memory, you'll get a runtime error. You would either need to change the declaration to

char ch[] = "krishna is the best";

or allocate a dynamic buffer and copy the contents of the string to it

char *ch = "krishna is the best";
char *buf = malloc(strlen(ch) + 1);
if (buf)
{
  strcpy(buf, ch);
  // reverse the contents of buf
}

in order to accomplish a reversal in place.

If it's just the output that needs to be reversed, then storage doesn't really matter, you'd just need a couple of pointers to keep track of the beginning and end of each substring. For example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(void)
{
  char *ch = "krishna is the best";
  char *start, *end;

  // point to the beginning of the string
  start = ch;

  // find the next space in the string
  end = strchr(start, ' ');

  // while there are more spaces in the string
  while (end != NULL)
  {
    // set up a temporary pointer, starting at the space following the
    // current word
    char *p = end;

    // while aren't at the beginning of the current word, decrement the
    // pointer and print the character it points to
    while (p-- != start)
      putchar(*p);

    putchar(' ');

    // find the next space character, starting at the character
    // following the previous space character.
    start = end + 1;
    end = strchr(start, ' ');
  }

  // We didn't find another space character, meaning we're at the start of
  // the last word in the string.  We find the end by adding the length of the
  // last word to the start pointer.
  end = start + strlen(start);

  // Work our way back to the start of the word, printing
  // each character.
  while (end-- != start)
    putchar(*end);

  putchar('\n');
  fflush(stdout);
  return 0;
}

There's probably a better way to do that, this is just off the top of my head.

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This would be great, but it doesn't reverse the string, as you said. Whilst it does reverse the output, it doesn't give you that data in a format you can use elsewhere. Which in most situations would be required. –  Richard J. Ross III Aug 29 '12 at 14:09
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Not sure of specific code right now, but here is the way I would do it (assuming you were able to write over original variable).

1) Split the string into an array of words using blank space as the delimiter

2) Loop through array and sort the words in reverse order

3) Rebuild the string and assign back to variable.

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Here is an in-place swap using XOR:

void reverseStr(char *string)
{
    char *start = string;
    char *end = string + strlen(string) - 1;

    while (end > start) {
        if (*start != *end)
        {
            *start = *start ^ *end;
            *end   = *start ^ *end;
            *start = *start ^ *end;
        }

        start++;
        end--;
    }
}

This of course assumes that string is in writeable memory, so don't come complaining that it isn't.

If you need to split the words first, then give me a few minutes and I'll write something up.

EDIT:

For words separated by space (0x20), the following code should work:

void reverseStr(char *string)
{
    // pointer to start of word
    char *wordStart = string;

    // pointer to end of word
    char *wordEnd = NULL;

    // whether we should stop or not
    char stop = 0;

    while (!stop)
    {
        // find the end of the first word
        wordEnd = strchr(wordStart, ' ');
        if (wordEnd == NULL) 
        {
            // if we didn't a word, then search for the end of the string, then stop after this iteration
            wordEnd = strchr(wordStart, '\0');
            stop = 1; // last word in string
        }

        // in place XOR swap
        char *start = wordStart;
        char *end   = wordEnd - 1; // -1 for the space

        while (end > start) {
            if (*start != *end)
            {
                *start = *start ^ *end;
                *end   = *start ^ *end;
                *start = *start ^ *end;
            }

            start++;
            end--;
        }

        wordStart = wordEnd + 1; // +1 for the space
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 but elloboration to this code is neccessary.Iam new to C programming –  kTiwari Aug 29 '12 at 13:30
    
@krishnaChandra check it out now, It now has support for word swapping. –  Richard J. Ross III Aug 29 '12 at 13:34
3  
What is the point of XOR instead of using a tmp variable? You get far more obscure code, the same amount of instructions, but possibly slower instructions, since an XOR instruction is likely slower and never faster than a 8-bit move. If you can provide a rational explanation to why XOR would be better, I'll happily switch my downvote to an upvote. –  Lundin Aug 29 '12 at 13:49
    
@Lundin it truly depends on the amount of memory available & size of the data (per piece) that you are moving. If I was moving 128 bit unsigned long longs, and I only have 4KB of ram, I need to attempt to conserve as much as I can. With this method, I only use 5 bytes of RAM, as apposed to the 18 or so bytes requried to use a temporary variable. Admittedly, in the situation outlined above there is very little difference, but I was speaking in the broad picture (an in-place swap). –  Richard J. Ross III Aug 29 '12 at 14:05
    
-1 for using XOR swap –  Paul R Aug 30 '12 at 14:03
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Here is my working solution ->  
 #include<stdio.h>
    #include<ctype.h>
    #include<string.h>

    char * reverse(char *begin, char *end)
    {
      char temp;
      while (begin < end)
      {
        temp = *begin;
        *begin++ = *end;
        *end-- = temp;
      }
    }

    /*Function to reverse words*/
    char * reverseWords(char *s)
    {
      char *word_begin = s;
      char *temp = s; /* temp is for word boundry */

      while( *temp )
      {
        temp++;
        if (*temp == '\0')
        {
          reverse(word_begin, temp-1);
        }
        else if(*temp == ' ')
        {
          reverse(word_begin, temp-1);
          word_begin = temp+1;
        }
      } /* End of while */
      return s;
    }

    int main(void)
    {
        char str[]="This is the test";
        printf("\nOriginal String is -> %s",str);
        printf("\nReverse Words \t   -> %s",reverseWords(str));
      return 0;
    }
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Here is my working solution ->  
#include<stdio.h>
#include<ctype.h>
#include<string.h>

char * reverse(char *begin, char *end)
{
  char temp;
  while (begin < end)
  {
    temp = *begin;
    *begin++ = *end;
    *end-- = temp;
  }
}

/*Function to reverse words*/
char * reverseWords(char *s)
{
  char *word_begin = s;
  char *temp = s; /* temp is for word boundry */

  while( *temp )
  {
    temp++;
    if (*temp == '\0')
    {
      reverse(word_begin, temp-1);
    }
    else if(*temp == ' ')
    {
      reverse(word_begin, temp-1);
      word_begin = temp+1;
    }
  } /* End of while */
  return s;
}

int main(void)
{
    char str[]="This is the test";
    printf("\nOriginal String is -> %s",str);
    printf("\nReverse Words \t   -> %s",reverseWords(str));
  return 0;
}
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