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Given any series of input dates with a single state of either Open or Closed such that at a very minimum there is a single input date (open state) which results in a single date (Closed, max Date) being added to complete the output sequence what algorithm would you use to generate output which obeys the following?

1. There are no consecutive Open dates and no consecutive Closed dates.

2. For each Open date there is exactly one Closed date.

3. The first date should be Open and the last date should be Closed.

4. Apart from the first Open date and the last Closed date each Open date should immediately follow the previous Closed date, or put another way, each Closed date should be the day before the next Open date.

5. The final date is Closed and Max date (9999-12-31, in this example)

This is not a homework exercise, I've implemented this in C# and it's production code that will execute millions of times. Performance is important, yes, but very much secondary to readability. The algorithm I've used works perfectly well but looks awful. Any language welcome. I'll translate as necessary. Thanks.

Example 1

input:
[2000-01-01,open] 

output: 
[2000-01-01,open]
[9999-12-31,closed]

Example 2

input: 
[2000-01-01,open]
[2001-01-01,open]

output: 
[2000-01-01,open]
[2000-12-31,closed]
[2001-01-01,open]
[9999-12-31,closed]

Example 3

input: 
[2000-01-01,open]
[2004-04-30,closed]

output: 
[2000-01-01,open]
[2004-04-30,closed]
[2004-05-01,open]
[9999-12-31,closed]

Example 4

input: 
[2000-01-01,open]
[2000-03-17,open]
[2002-09-11,closed]
[2003-04-07,closed]

output: 
[2000-01-01,open]
[2000-03-16,closed]
[2000-03-17,open]
[2002-09-11,closed]
[2002-09-12,open]
[2003-04-07,closed]
[2003-04-08,open]
[9999-12-31,closed]

Dare I ask which class of language solves this kind of problem best?

share|improve this question
    
Is this homework? –  JohnB Aug 29 '12 at 13:39
    
Nope. It's production code. Hoping to see a nicer implementation I'd not considered. –  ofraski Aug 29 '12 at 13:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
  1. Sort the input by date.
  2. Iterate through the input, keeping track of the current state.
  3. If state is open and an open date is encountered, insert a closed date.
  4. If state is closed and a closed date is encountered, insert an open date.
  5. If state is closed and an open date is encountered that is not the day after the previous closed date, insert an open date and a closed date to fill that gap.
  6. When done iterating through input, if state is open, insert final closed date.
  7. When done iterating through input, if state is closed and final closed date is not 9999-12-31. insert the final open and closed dates.
share|improve this answer
    
This is the approach I used. I hoped I might see an implementation that looks better than the one I ended up with. –  ofraski Aug 31 '12 at 13:29

You can first generate a list of all open dates and then calculate closing dates by subtracting one day from each but the first opening date:

C# pseudo-code:

  var opendates = input.Select ( date =>
      date.Type == closing ? date.Date + 1day : date.Date
  ).Sort ();
  closingdates = opendates.Skip (1).Select (date => date - 1).Append ( new Date [] { 9999-12-31 } );
share|improve this answer

So the solution should be fast since performance is crucial here. Also it should support online processing, so when the system is running you can add new opening/closing dates at any time you want and get an updated schedule immediately.

As the major operation in this problem is sorting, I would suggest to use a heap. Each node in the heap stores a date/state pair. The algorithm initiates with an empty heap and continuously develops it as reading inputs. When there's new data coming, the algorithm inserts it into the tree, which takes O(lgN). When there's a request to pull a schedule, the algorithm performs an in-order traverse, which takes O(N). The algorithm also should balance itself once a while for better performance.

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