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Basically, i have done my program so that it will display differences in strings and display the whole line. I want to highlight (in a colour) the differences in the line.

Example:

Original at line 5
   <rect x="60.01" width="855.38" id="rect_1" y="-244.35" height="641.13" style="stroke-width: 1; stroke: rgb(0, 0, 0); fill: none; "/>

Edited at line 5
   <rect x="298.43" width="340.00" y="131.12" height="380.00" id="rect_1" style="stroke-width: 1; stroke: rgb(0, 0, 0); fill: rgb(255, 102, 0); "/>

In this example, the width is different from the 'original' from the 'edited' version. I would like to be able to highlight that difference and any other difference.

My code so far:

Patch patch = DiffUtils.diff(centralFile, remoteFile);
        StringBuffer resultsBuff = new StringBuffer(remoteFileData.length);
        for (Delta delta : patch.getDeltas())
            {
            resultsBuff.append("Original at line " + delta.getOriginal().getPosition() + "\n");
            for (Object line : delta.getOriginal().getLines())
                {
                resultsBuff.append("   " + line + "\n");
                }
            resultsBuff.append("Edited at line " + delta.getRevised().getPosition() + "\n");
            for (Object line : delta.getRevised().getLines())
                {
                resultsBuff.append("   " + line + "\n");
                }
            resultsBuff.append("\n");
            }
        return resultsBuff.toString();
        }

That will display two whole lines like the example before (the original and the edited version) I want to be able to highlight the changes that have actually been made, is there any way to do this in Java?

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1  
What is the question? –  David B Aug 29 '12 at 13:49
1  
I want to be able to highlight the changes that have actually been made, is there anyway to be able to do this? Too many people on here spend too much time criticising peoples 'questions' rather than actually helping others out. –  Buzz Lightyear Aug 29 '12 at 13:51
    
"highlight (in a colour)" What is this 'color' in? Is it in a web-app.? A desktop rich client GUI? A command-line interface? A kaleidoscope? –  Andrew Thompson Aug 29 '12 at 13:52
    
@AndrewThompson webapp. Any colour. –  Buzz Lightyear Aug 29 '12 at 13:53
1  
Your question is far too vague. We need a concise, solvable question. Just throwing up your hands and saying, "HOW I DO THIS?!" is a weak attempt. Why should we spend our time coaxing out your question when there are plenty of others that have done more homework? –  David B Aug 29 '12 at 13:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Any particular reason why you are trying to rewrite common tools like WinDiff and Beyond Compare?
In case you really need it:
the main difficulty is finding where the differences stop
<rect x="60.01" width="855.38" id="rect_1" y="-244.35" height="641.13" style="stroke-width: 1; stroke: rgb(0, 0, 0); fill: none; "/>
<rect x="298.43" width="340.00" y="131.12" height="380.00" id="rect_1" style="stroke-width: 1; stroke: rgb(0, 0, 0); fill: rgb(255, 102, 0); "/>

What would you consider to be the difference?
1) changed value of "x" and "width" are easy - they come in the same sequence
2) what do you think happened to "id" and it's value? how do you want to highlight it?

Assuming that you always know which is the "original"
I suggest you scan the "original" string, tokenise it, match each token separately and remove matched ones. When you exhausted all your "original" tokens only then you start highlighting difference on remainder of "original" and "edited".

share|improve this answer
    
'the value of' is what i'd like to highlight. seems like a good idea, thanks! –  Buzz Lightyear Aug 29 '12 at 13:59
    
Sorry, what do you mean by "value of"? "60.01" in "original" and "298.43" in "edited"? Once you finished with matched tokens you compare unmatched ones by tokenising them even further, that is when the difficulty comes in finding where the change is - on unformatted data it is nearly impossible. Consider "original": id1="1" id2="2" and "edited": id2="1" id1="2" –  Germann Arlington Aug 29 '12 at 14:08
    
Yeah like "60.01" would be highlighted, ideally. Could be a problem as i dont no why it sometimes spits out unformatted strings :S! –  Buzz Lightyear Aug 29 '12 at 14:12
    
Sometimes I just wonder what are the reasons some people here find to flag someone's answers as "useless/unhelpful"? How do they decide what is helpful and what isn't? –  Germann Arlington Aug 29 '12 at 14:24
    
I wouldn't worry about it, there is a certain arrogance and attitude problem that 50% of the people of this site have, as in they think they are better than you. –  Buzz Lightyear Aug 29 '12 at 14:27

Diff match patch is library available in Java that allows you to generate a diff viewer like html. Maybe it can be en of help to you? http://code.google.com/p/google-diff-match-patch/

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To answer the question you asked, it depends on the means by which you display the entire text. I can think of two ways and I'm sure there are others.

  1. The simplest way is to write out your file to System.out using println(). This will dump the file contents to the Eclipse console. To highlight something write that line instead to System.err instead of System.out resulting in the line being written to the console in red. That gives you the simplest way to highlight changes, but it's at the line level and not the character level.
  2. Beyond that things get very complex as you're writing some kind of tool like the compare tool in Eclipse. Once you've determined what has changed (something I think that is outside the scope of this question), there are widgets you can use to build tool UI to display those changes. One such widget is the StyledText widget, a text widget that gives you control over color, font and other text attributes on a text range basis.
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I have found a much simpler way to do this. I have saved each line into a string array (splitting up each element/parameter), ordering the string alphabetically and then comparing the strings. Listing the ones which have changed.

resultsBuff.append("\nEdited at line " + delta.getRevised().getPosition() + "\n");
            for (Object line : delta.getRevised().getLines())
                {

                String xmlLineEdit = line.toString();//save 'original' xml line into string

            XMLInputFactory xif = XMLInputFactory.newFactory();   
            XMLStreamReader xsr = xif.createXMLStreamReader(new StringReader(xmlLineEdit));//put xml into parser

            xsr.nextTag(); // Advance to svg element
            int attributeCount = xsr.getAttributeCount();//get the number of attributes
            array1 = new String[attributeCount];
            for(int x=0; x<attributeCount; x++) //for each attribute
               {
            //StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();//might remove
            array1[x]= xsr.getAttributeLocalName(x) + "=\"" + xsr.getAttributeValue(x) + "\"";//add attributes and values to an array
               }

            Arrays.sort(array1);//sort the array alphabetically
share|improve this answer
    
How does it differ from my suggested method? –  Germann Arlington Sep 3 '12 at 12:20
    
And I asked about comparing the order - in case of your particular string the order of attributes may be not important, but if you use (as you should) the same code to compare general text and/or source code the order of tokens becomes important: x++; y=x; produces completely different result from y=x; x++;. So, it would make sense to add a parameter to your function that will allow you to ignore or take into account tokens' order. –  Germann Arlington Sep 3 '12 at 12:31

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