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I am writing some code to implement a deep copy of an object.

Here is my code:

//---------------------------------------------------------------------------

#pragma hdrstop

#include <tchar.h>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <conio.h>

using namespace std;

//---------------------------------------------------------------------------

class Wheel
{
public:
    Wheel() : pressure(32)
    {
        ptrSize = new int(30);
    }
    Wheel(int s, int p) : pressure(p)
    {
        ptrSize = new int(s);
    }
    ~Wheel()
    {
        delete ptrSize;
    }
    void pump(int amount)
    {
        pressure += amount;
    }
    int getSize()
    {
        return *ptrSize;
    }
    int getPressure()
    {
        return pressure;
    }
private:
    int *ptrSize;
    int pressure;
};

class RacingCar
{
public:
    RacingCar()
    {
        speed = 0;
        *carWheels = new Wheel[4];
    }
    RacingCar(int s)
    {
        speed = s;
    }
    RacingCar(RacingCar &oldObject)
    {
        for ( int i = 0; i < sizeof(carWheels)/sizeof(carWheels[0]); ++i)
        {
            Wheel oldObjectWheel = oldObject.getWheel(i);
            carWheels[i]=new Wheel(oldObjectWheel.getSize(),oldObjectWheel.getPressure());
        }
    }
    void Accelerate()
    {
        speed = speed + 10;
    }
    Wheel getWheel(int id)
    {
        return *carWheels[id];
    }
    void printDetails()
    {
        cout << carWheels[0];
        cout << carWheels[1];
        cout << carWheels[2];
        cout << carWheels[3];
    }
private:
    int speed;
    Wheel *carWheels[4];
};

#pragma argsused
int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{

RacingCar testCar;
testCar.printDetails();

RacingCar newCar = testCar;
newCar.printDetails();

getch();
return 0;
}
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------

For some reason, my C++ builder crashes after compiling this code. Is there anything above that is not correct that would cause this to crash. There is no compile error, the program just crashes.

share|improve this question
1  
Use a debugger, downvoted for lack of research effort until you do this. –  AAA Aug 29 '12 at 14:26
1  
Why are you making an array of 4 pointers in the class, allocating 4 new Wheels for the first one in your constructor, and then iterating over the initial 4? Just use std::array<Wheel, 4> if you always want four wheels. No need for dynamic allocation anywhere. –  chris Aug 29 '12 at 14:28
    
You have no copy c-tor and assignment operator for Wheel class, that's incorrect in most cases, if you use pointers. Why not use std::vector, if you write on C++? –  ForEveR Aug 29 '12 at 14:31
    
ptrSize looks like a prime candidate to be just a plain old int as well. –  chris Aug 29 '12 at 14:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is:

Wheel *carWheels[4];

and

*carWheels = new Wheel[4];

this only allocates 4 Wheels for carWheels[0]. Along with

return *carWheels[id];

If id is not 0, this will lead to undefined behavior because, as previously stated, only the first element is a valid pointer.

Besides this, the code is horrible. Avoid raw pointers. There are much better alternatives in C++. Use std::vector or std::array where you'd use a C-array, and smart pointers where you'd use raw ones.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for "the code is horrible". –  mfontanini Aug 29 '12 at 14:37

Generally in my experience, if my compiler/tool crashes, I'm probably doing something so wrong that it never even occurred to the compiler writers to check for it.

The best way to track down such things is to comment out code until it works again, then slowly bring stuff back in until you find the offending part.

As a design note, I'd say that if it were me, I'd implement a copy constructor for Wheel as well, rather than having to write a complex deep copy constructor for classes like RacingCar that use it.

share|improve this answer
1  
I'd say at least finding out where it is by using the debugger is much faster. The day I made the transition from one to the other was a good day. –  chris Aug 29 '12 at 14:31
1  
@chris - How's he supposed to do that, if the compiler is crashing? Debug the compiler? –  T.E.D. Aug 29 '12 at 14:35
1  
Oh, I didn't notice the part about the compiler crashing. I highly doubt that's what's actually meant, though. I suspect it's just the program crashing because of the wrong pointer usage. –  chris Aug 29 '12 at 15:05
    
@chris - I don't think you read the last paragraph (after the code, so easy to miss) in the OQ. He makes it pretty clear that its his builder tool crashing, not his actual program. –  T.E.D. Aug 29 '12 at 15:27
    
I read it, but it seems more likely that it's a case of miswording it than that crashing rather than the program being compiled. –  chris Aug 29 '12 at 15:36

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