Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following peace of script holds with error due to a deadlock:

sqlQuery = """INSERT INTO gps_points (gps_track_segment_id, gps_unit_id, date, lat,  lng) SELECT MAX(gps_track_segments.id) AS gps_track_segment_id, %(gps_unit_id)s AS gps_unit_id, %(date)s AS date, %(lat)s AS lat, %(lng)s AS lng FROM gps_track_segments 
    INNER JOIN gps_tracks ON gps_track_segments.gps_track_id = gps_tracks.id WHERE gps_tracks.hash = %(track)s"""

from django.db import connection, transaction
cursor = connection.cursor()
success = cursor.execute(sqlQuery, point)
transaction.commit_unless_managed()

The errorlog shows:

2012-08-28 12:37:58,051 - django.db.backends - DEBUG - (0.018) INSERT INTO gps_points (gps_track_segment_id, gps_unit_id, date, lat, lng) SELECT MAX(gps_track_segments.id) AS gps_track_segment_id, 121 AS gps_unit_id, '2012-08-28 12:37:56' AS date, 51361100 AS lat, 4983910 AS lng FROM gps_track_segments 
    INNER JOIN gps_tracks ON gps_track_segments.gps_track_id = gps_tracks.id WHERE gps_tracks.hash = '7f5d950564786e182e175fb5d8e1b937528f85cc1ddabbee0d53859fb603ede3'; args={'gps_unit_id': 121L, 'lat': 51361100, 'date': '2012-08-28 12:37:56', 'course': None, 'track': u'7f5d950564786e182e175fb5d8e1b937528f85cc1ddabbee0d53859fb603ede3', 'speed': '0.0', 'lng': 4983910, 'segment': 5, 'altitude': None, 'accuracy': None}
Exception in thread Thread-1:
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/usr/lib64/python2.6/threading.py", line 532, in __bootstrap_inner
self.run()
  File "/usr/lib64/python2.6/threading.py", line 484, in run
self.__target(*self.__args, **self.__kwargs)
  ...
  ...
  File "/tcpserver/gpslibs.py", line 75, in saveGpsPoint
success = cursor.execute(sqlQuery, point)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.6/site-packages/django/db/backends/util.py", line 40, in execute
return self.cursor.execute(sql, params)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.6/site-packages/django/db/backends/mysql/base.py", line 114, in execute
return self.cursor.execute(query, args)
  File "/usr/lib64/python2.6/site-packages/MySQLdb/cursors.py", line 173, in execute
self.errorhandler(self, exc, value)
  File "/usr/lib64/python2.6/site-packages/MySQLdb/connections.py", line 36, in defaulterrorhandler
raise errorclass, errorvalue
DatabaseError: (1213, 'Deadlock found when trying to get lock; try restarting transaction')

With the mysql command SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUS I saw that the above query conflicts with a query requested by the php website. The thing is that sometimes the php-request is rolled back and sometimes the INSERT. The last case results in the script stopping with the deadlock error. Since it's very difficult to change the query's involved. I like to now if:

Can I somehow make a Django/Python script that doesn't fail on the deadlock and just tries again? Ofcouse I don't realy care about the php request failing or getting a rollback. It's easy to handle that from a usuability point of view. I do care about the back-end script failing. This needs to work above all else

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

Can I somehow make a Django/Python script that doesn't fail on the deadlock and just tries again?

You can catch the exception raised DatabaseError and then perform your logic of executing the transaction again (perhaps by acquiring a write lock on the table first before inserting the row).

try:
    success = cursor.execute(sqlQuery, point)
except DatabaseError:
     # retry here

You should ideally wrap it in a method that you can call again.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought of that, but I'm not sure if the script is crashing because I didn't have a try catch statement or because of the deadlock itself. If I were to retry if (with your example), isn't there a change the locks keep piling up and maybe even the data gets inserted multiple times? –  Jeroen Aug 29 '12 at 15:03
    
The script is crashing because you are not catching the exception; and the exception is raised because the system cannot get a lock. Now, if you can get an exclusive write lock, then it should allow your insert query to be executed - which would prevent the exception from being raised (unless it causes another exception - which is why you should always catch exceptions, especially when interfacing with external systems). –  Burhan Khalid Aug 29 '12 at 15:05
    
ok, I'm not so sure what transaction.commit_unless_managed() does for me. How can I get a write lock and what happens if it doesn't get one? Could you make a more elaboreted example with a rollback in the except loop? I don't realy see how to make a function that's not an endless loop itself (and 'deadlocking' the script except for the database?) –  Jeroen Aug 29 '12 at 15:21
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.