Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm making web-application for monitoring file movement between three different Systems, each system will generate a log file with below format:

Folder, Filename, DataTime, Filesize

Requirement is to identify if file generated at System1 is transferred successfully to 3rd System. And also to identify failed point.

I'm using SQLite database as I have to hold failed files information for 7 days.

Database design:

Folder, Filename, DateTime, FileSize, FileSource

FileSource can be System1, System2, System3.

This way I can do bulk inserts, but will slow down identifying failed files, can anyone help me to write good SQL to identify failed files.

for eg: sample data

folder1, file1, 2012-29-08 23:01:02, 10, S1
folder1, file1, 2012-29-08 23:03:02, 10, S2

The above ex data means folder1/file1 transfer is failed between S2 to S3.

Note: More than 10 thousands of files will transfer per day.

share|improve this question
    
It's not home work, I did find the missing files using below SQL <br /> SELECT folder, filename, count() from tab group by folder, filename having count() < 3; But to find failed location I have to run query for each missing file. –  user1261267 Aug 29 '12 at 14:50
2  
Fair enough, but it's going to help you get a good answer if you try to focus the question title, and then get to the real problem. The requirement paragraph suggests that there could be half a dozen questions here. –  Mark Dickinson Aug 29 '12 at 15:03

2 Answers 2

I'm not sure you can get there from here. You might be better off recording the error codes from the programs that actually carry out the transfers.

The table you have now has some problems.

CREATE TABLE filelog (
  folder text, 
  filename text, 
  datatime timestamp, 
  filesize integer, 
  filesource text);

-- Your failed transfer . . .
INSERT INTO "filelog" VALUES('folder1','file1','2012-08-29 23:01:02',10,'S1');
INSERT INTO "filelog" VALUES('folder1','file1','2012-08-29 23:03:02',10,'S2');
-- . . . and a duplicate of it.
INSERT INTO "filelog" VALUES('folder1','file1','2012-08-29 23:01:02',10,'S1');
INSERT INTO "filelog" VALUES('folder1','file1','2012-08-29 23:03:02',10,'S2');

Substituting my table name, your query was

select folder, filename, count() 
from filelog group by folder, filename having count() < 3;

With the data above, your query will return no rows, even though there are two failures. (Or two copies of one failure.) The first step in fixing it is to declare a defensible primary key.

CREATE TABLE filelog (
  folder text, 
  filename text, 
  datatime timestamp, 
  filesize integer, 
  filesource text,
  primary key (folder, filename, datatime)
);

That primary key constraint will prevent you from entering a single transfer twice. It lets you transfer the same file more than once per day, which might make sense when the first transfer fails.

-- Your failed transfer . . .
INSERT INTO "filelog" VALUES('folder1','file1','2012-08-29 23:01:02',10,'S1');
INSERT INTO "filelog" VALUES('folder1','file1','2012-08-29 23:03:02',10,'S2');
-- . . . and an earlier transfer that also failed.
INSERT INTO "filelog" VALUES('folder1','file1','2012-08-23 23:01:02',10,'S1');
INSERT INTO "filelog" VALUES('folder1','file1','2012-08-23 23:03:02',10,'S2');

Your query will again return no rows. We need a better definition of successful and failed transfers.

It seems that a successful transfer has these characteristics.

  • It includes all three sources--S1, S2, and S3.
  • It's for a single pathname, where pathname means folder + directory separator + filename.
  • The timestamps follow filesource order. In other words, "datatime" for S1 comes before "datatime" for S2, and "datatime" for S2 comes before "datatime" for S3.
  • For any unique {folder, filename, datatime} the number of bytes is the same for all three file sources.

And the *big, troublesome characteristic . . .

  • All three rows for a single file transfer must belong to a single "batch" (for lack of a better word). That means we must not let the query group together the first two rows below (a failed transfer) with the final row below (part of a successful transfer), even though the timestamps would be in the right order and the bytes transferred would be correct.

    folder1  file1  2012-08-29 23:01:02  10  S1
    folder1  file1  2012-08-29 23:03:02  10  S2
    folder1  file1  2012-08-29 23:45:02  10  S1
    folder1  file1  2012-08-29 23:48:02  10  S2
    folder1  file1  2012-08-29 23:53:02  10  S3
    

This will be somewhat complicated. And I might have completely misunderstood your criteria for successful transfers.

(You can probably come up with a better name for the column "datatime".)

share|improve this answer

You completely misunderstood my scenario

CREATE TABLE filelog (
   folder       text, 
   filename     text, 
   transferTime     timestamp, 
   filesize     integer, -- what time the transfer occurs at this filesource 
   filesource   text,
   primary key (folder, filename, filesource)
   );

Each source will generate a log file which includes the files they transfer or process.

Case: If the file1.txt found in log file of S1 and is missing in log file of S2, this means the transfer failed between S1 & S2.

If file1.txt found at both S1, and S2 log file and not in S3 log file transfer is failed between S2 & S3 or S3 did not process the file.

With this query I can find files which are missed at either S2 or S3:

select folder, filename, filesource, count(*) 
from filelog 
group by folder, filename, filesource
having count() < 3;

While replying to you I got the answer, if count is 1 this means transfer failed at S1 & S3, or if count is 2 this means transfer failed between S2 and S3.

Thanks for your reply. @catcall

share|improve this answer
    
No, I think I understood it pretty well. What you seem to be missing--possibly because it can't happen, but possibly because you don't understand the SQL--is that your query won't identify missed files under many reasonable circumstances. Search my answer for "an earlier transfer that also failed". Two transfers of a single pathname that fail between S2 and S3 leave you with 4 rows. Your group by folder, filename having count() < 3 returns neither of those failures, because 4 is not less than 3. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Aug 29 '12 at 19:53
    
As the filesource is included as primary key, which make sure that only single instance of folder/file@filesource is available at any given time, failed transfer will simply update the re-transmission date. I tested with some sample data and found the answers to be accurate. –  user1261267 Aug 29 '12 at 20:48
    
I see. The filesource wasn't part of the primary key until you edited your response a few minutes ago. Glad you found a solution. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Aug 29 '12 at 21:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.