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In the C++11 standard there is a note regarding the array backing the uniform initialisation that states:

The implementation is free to allocate the array in read-only memory if an explicit array with the same initializer could be so allocated.

Does GCC/Clang/VS take advantage of this? Or is every initialisation using this feature subject to additional data on the stack, and additional initialisation time for this hidden array?

For instance, given the following example:

void function()
{
    std::vector<std::string> values = { "First", "Second" };
...

Would each of the compilers mentioned above store the backing array to the uniform initialisation in the same memory as a variable declared static const? And would each of the compilers initialise the backing array when the function is called, or on application initialisation? (I'm not talking about the std::initializer_list<std::string> that would be created, but rather the "hidden array" it refers to.

share|improve this question
    
No. That is just a note. Standard does not require them to. Standard does not even require that std::initializer_list<T>::size() is constexpr. In practice it depends on compiler options and compiler-specific attributes used. –  Öö Tiib Sep 15 '12 at 19:26
    
I understand the standard does not require them to. The question is: does GCC, Clang or VS take advantage of this? –  Shane Sep 19 '12 at 8:34

2 Answers 2

This is my attempt to answer my own question for at least GCC. My understanding of the assembler output of gcc is not fantastic, so please correct as necessary.

Using initializer_test.cpp:

#include <vector>

int main()
{
    std::vector<long> values = { 123456, 123457, 123458 };
    return 0;
}

And compiling using gcc v4.6.3 using the following command line:

g++ -Wa,-adhln -g initializer_test.cpp -masm=intel -std=c++0x -fverbose-asm | c++filt | view -

I get the following output (cut down to the hopefully relevant bits):

   5:initializer_test.cpp ****     std::vector<long> values = { 123456, 123457, 123458 };
 100                    .loc 2 5 0
 101 0009 488D45EF      lea rax, [rbp-17]   # tmp62,
 102 000d 4889C7        mov rdi, rax    #, tmp62
 103                    .cfi_offset 3, -24
 104 0010 E8000000      call    std::allocator<long>::allocator()   #
 104      00
 105 0015 488D45D0      lea rax, [rbp-48]   # tmp63,
 106 0019 BA030000      mov edx, 3  #,                      <-- Parameter 3
 106      00
 107 001e BE000000      mov esi, OFFSET FLAT:._42   #,      <-- Parameter 2
 107      00
 108 0023 4889C7        mov rdi, rax    #, tmp63            <-- Parameter 1
 109 0026 E8000000      call    std::initializer_list<long>::initializer_list(long const*, unsigned long)   #
 109      00
 110 002b 488D4DEF      lea rcx, [rbp-17]   # tmp64,
 111 002f 488B75D0      mov rsi, QWORD PTR [rbp-48] # tmp65, D.10602
 112 0033 488B55D8      mov rdx, QWORD PTR [rbp-40] # tmp66, D.10602
 113 0037 488D45B0      lea rax, [rbp-80]   # tmp67,
 114 003b 4889C7        mov rdi, rax    #, tmp67
 115                .LEHB0:
 116 003e E8000000      call    std::vector<long, std::allocator<long> >::vector(std::initializer_list<long>, std::allocator<long> const&)  #
 116      00
 117                .LEHE0:
 118                    .loc 2 5 0 is_stmt 0 discriminator 1
 119 0043 488D45EF      lea rax, [rbp-17]   # tmp68,
 120 0047 4889C7        mov rdi, rax    #, tmp68
 121 004a E8000000      call    std::allocator<long>::~allocator()  #

and

 1678                   .section    .rodata
 1679 0002 00000000         .align 16
 1679      00000000 
 1679      00000000 
 1679      0000
 1682               ._42:
 1683 0010 40E20100         .quad   123456
 1683      00000000 
 1684 0018 41E20100         .quad   123457
 1684      00000000 
 1685 0020 42E20100         .quad   123458
 1685      00000000 

Now if I'm understanding the call on line 109 correctly in the context of x86-64 System V AMD64 ABI calling convention (the parameters I've annotated to the code listing), this is showing that the backing array is being stored in .rodata, which I am taking to be the same memory as static const data. At least for gcc 4.6 anyway.

Performing a similar thing test but with optimisations turned on (-O2) it seems the initializer_list is optimised out:

  70                    .file 2 "/usr/include/c++/4.6/ext/new_allocator.h"
  71                    .loc 2 92 0
  72 0004 BF180000      mov edi, 24 #,
  72      00
  73 0009 E8000000      call    operator new(unsigned long) #
  73      00
  74                .LVL1:
  75                    .file 3 "/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_algobase.h"
  76                    .loc 3 366 0
  77 000e 488B1500      mov rdx, QWORD PTR ._42[rip]    # ._42, ._42
  77      000000
  90                    .file 4 "/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_vector.h"
  91                    .loc 4 155 0
  92 0015 4885C0        test    rax, rax    # D.11805
 105                    .loc 3 366 0
 106 0018 488910        mov QWORD PTR [rax], rdx    #* D.11805, ._42
 107 001b 488B1500      mov rdx, QWORD PTR ._42[rip+8]  # ._42, ._42
 107      000000
 108 0022 48895008      mov QWORD PTR [rax+8], rdx  #, ._42
 109 0026 488B1500      mov rdx, QWORD PTR ._42[rip+16] # ._42, ._42
 109      000000
 110 002d 48895010      mov QWORD PTR [rax+16], rdx #, ._42
 124                    .loc 4 155 0
 125 0031 7408          je  .L8 #,
 126                .LVL3:
 127                .LBB342:
 128                .LBB343:
 129                    .loc 2 98 0
 130 0033 4889C7        mov rdi, rax    #, D.11805
 131 0036 E8000000      call    operator delete(void*)  #

All in all, std::initializer_list is looking pretty optimal in gcc.

share|improve this answer
    
.rodata -> read-only data. :) –  Xeo Sep 26 '12 at 9:46
    
+1 for answering your own and sharing here. –  Antoine Oct 24 '12 at 9:55

First of all: VC++, as of version VS11=VS2012 in its initial release does not support initializer lists, so the question is a bit moot for VS atm., but as I'm sure they'll patch this up, it should become relevant in a few months (or years).

As additional info, I'll add what VS 2012 does with local array initialization, everybody may draw it's own conclusion as for what that means for when they'll implement initializer lists:

Here's initialization of built-in arrays what VC++2012 spits out in the default release mode of the compiler:

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
00B91002  in          al,dx  
00B91003  sub         esp,28h  
00B91006  mov         eax,dword ptr ds:[00B94018h]  
00B9100B  xor         eax,ebp  
00B9100D  mov         dword ptr [ebp-4],eax  
00B91010  push        esi  
    int numbers[] = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9};
00B91011  mov         dword ptr [numbers],1  
00B91018  mov         dword ptr [ebp-24h],2  
00B9101F  mov         dword ptr [ebp-20h],3  
00B91026  mov         dword ptr [ebp-1Ch],4  
00B9102D  mov         dword ptr [ebp-18h],5  
00B91034  mov         dword ptr [ebp-14h],6  
00B9103B  mov         dword ptr [ebp-10h],7  
00B91042  mov         dword ptr [ebp-0Ch],8  
00B91049  mov         dword ptr [ebp-8],9  

...

So this array is created/filled at function execution, no "static" storage involved as such.

share|improve this answer
1  
"This particular compiler doesn't support this feature, but when it does it might perhaps support it in this way" doesn't answer the question of how initializer lists are actually implemented. This answer is nothing but speculation. –  James McNellis Sep 23 '12 at 17:26
1  
@James - Pffff. Of course the way a compiler handles array initialization is completely unconnected to how it may implement initializer lists, as the two features aren't similar in any way of course. Did you actually read what I wrote and how I phrased it. Of course it's speculation! And as for not answering the Q: The Q is three particular compilers and I answered for one of them, which is more than anyone else did up to now. Not implemented (=answer wrt the Q rgd VS) and I provide the additional info that the nearest feature to i.l. it has, array init., is implemented that way. –  Martin Ba Sep 23 '12 at 18:27

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