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struct s1 { int a; int b; };
struct s2 { int a; int b; };

struct s2 test(void) {
    struct s1 s = { 1, 2 };
    return s; // incompatible types
}

In the above code, can I return s without creating a new struct s2 variable and populating it with s's values? It is guaranteed that struct s1 will always be identical to struct s2.

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1  
Why have a return value of type s2 when you want to return an instance of s1 ??? –  mathematician1975 Aug 29 '12 at 15:15
    
In my opinion, returning a struct is just a bad idea. Instead, I would require the caller pass a pointer to a struct that they manage and I would fill it in for them. –  mah Aug 29 '12 at 15:16
    
Why do you want to do this? Constructing a new struct s2 and returning it is essentially free (you are already returning the struct by value, and thus copying it). –  Mankarse Aug 29 '12 at 15:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can't return the struct directly, but you can avoid creating a separate variable in your source code by using a compound literal, which is a feature of C99.

struct s2 test(void) {
  struct s1 s = { 1, 2 };
  return (struct s2){s.a, s.b};
}
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Besides nos answer .. Note: [For Demo Only, its not an answer]

This is a real bad way to do it(Not suggested), but it can decieve compiler:-

struct s1 { int a; int b; };
struct s2 { int a; int b; };
struct s2 test(void) 
{
     struct s1 s = { 1, 2 };
     return *((struct s2*)(void*)&s);  
}

Its behaviour solely depends on compiler.If s1 and s2 are arranged same way then this works.

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You can return by casting, but shouldn't.

Casting will work here since you are confident that the bytes will be exactly the same so that at the memory level an s2 can be interpreted as an s1 faithfully.

However if someone ever adds a new field in s2 this will break horribly, etc. From a programming or software engineering perspective, you should convert, and if you really do expect s1 and s2 to stay compatible, you should write a copy ctor or translator or whatever to get from one to the other.

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1  
Casting raises the error: "Used type 'struct s2' where arithmetic or pointer type is required" –  rid Aug 29 '12 at 15:12
1  
@Radu: return *(struct s2 *) &s; –  ouah Aug 29 '12 at 15:15
1  
Yes, was just posting ouah's line. In general it's kind of rude to downvote everyone who is attempting to answer your question without giving them a chance to revise or clarify. –  djechlin Aug 29 '12 at 15:16
    
@djechlin, I didn't downvote nor upvote your answer. –  rid Aug 29 '12 at 15:17
    
@Radu, sorry, my bad, suggestive timing (guess I'm glad I wasn't ruder.) –  djechlin Aug 29 '12 at 15:51

I guess, as your coment suggest, that you are getting a compiler error. I suggest you cast the return statement:

return (struct s2) s;

it should work, instinctively. And if it doesn't maybe you can tweak the compiler to skip the checking by making the error a warning. And just for curiosity, why do you need this?

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It doesn't, it generates the error: "Used type 'struct s2' where arithmetic or pointer type is required" –  rid Aug 29 '12 at 15:15

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