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Let's say you have a uint64_t and care only about the high order bit for each byte in your uint64_t. Like so:

uint32_t: 0000 ... 1000 0000 1000 0000 1000 0000 1000 0000 ---> 0000 1111

Is there a faster way than:

   return
   (
     ((x >> 56) & 128)+
     ((x >> 49) &  64)+
     ((x >> 42) &  32)+
     ((x >> 35) &  16)+
     ((x >> 28) &   8)+
     ((x >> 21) &   4)+
     ((x >> 14) &   2)+
     ((x >>  7) &   1)
   )

Aka shifting x, masking, and adding the correct bit for each byte? This will compile to a lot of assembly and I'm looking for a quicker way... The machine I'm using only has up to SSE2 instructions and I failed to find helpful SIMD ops.

Thanks for the help.

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you could reinterpret the single bytes, loop through them and mask out the single bits. dunno if this is faster, but maybe the compiler can optimize it better. –  PlasmaHH Aug 29 '12 at 15:30
1  
Perhaps you can first mask with 0x8080808080808080 and then multiply by a particular constant to put the bits in more convenient locations, perhaps for use in a lookup table. –  R.. Aug 29 '12 at 15:30
    
Do you need the result, that is, a sequence of 8 bits as a number? Or would just checking if the HO bits are 1 or not, suffice for you? –  iccthedral Aug 29 '12 at 15:31
3  
Yes, pmovmskb does exactly what you want. IIRC there will be an integer instruction in AVX2 that you can use to do the same thing (gathers bits, forgot the mnemonic). –  harold Aug 29 '12 at 15:33
1  
@AndyRoss I was in the process of writing it, took a while because I really wanted to put that new instruction in there :) –  harold Aug 29 '12 at 15:44

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

As I mentioned in a comment, pmovmskb does what you want. Here's how you could use it:

MMX + SSE1:

movq mm0, input ; input can be r/m
pmovmskb output, mm0 ; output must be r

SSE2:

movq xmm0, input
pmovmskb output, xmm0

And I looked up the new way

BMI2:

mov rax, 0x8080808080808080
pext output, input, rax ; input must be r
share|improve this answer
    
+1 if you add the correct inline asm (with proper constraints) to generate optimal code using this method. –  R.. Aug 29 '12 at 15:44
1  
@R.. I would, but I've never done that before. I try not to touch GCC with a 10-foot pole. I had a look at those constraints and, well, maybe that code will appear in while.. maybe –  harold Aug 29 '12 at 15:51
    
OK +1 anyway. I'll add it if I get time to look into how to do it. –  R.. Aug 29 '12 at 15:52
    
thanks. exactly what i need. –  fission Aug 29 '12 at 16:31
    
Isn't there a simple intrinsic for this asm? –  rubenvb Aug 29 '12 at 18:54
return ((x & 0x8080808080808080) * 0x2040810204081) >> 56;

works. The & selects the bits you want to keep. The multiplications all the bits into the most significant byte, and the shift moves them to the least significant byte. Since multiplication is fast on most modern CPUs this shouldn't be much slower than using assembly.

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1  
This could actually be faster than pmovmsk, which is a quite slow instruction AFAIR. –  hirschhornsalz Aug 29 '12 at 21:36
    
@drhirsch 2 cycle latency (3 on AMD K10) and a throughput of 1 on a Core2, not that bad at all.. even just the multiplication here is worse. –  harold Aug 31 '12 at 8:31

And here's how to do it using SSE intrinsics:

#include <xmmintrin.h>
#include <inttypes.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main (void)
{
  uint64_t x
  = 0b0000000010000000000000001000000000000000100000000000000010000000;

  printf ("%x\n", _mm_movemask_pi8 ((__m64) x));
  return 0;
}

Works fine with:

gcc -msse
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for this. –  fission Aug 29 '12 at 16:31

You don't need all the separate logical ANDs, you can simplify it to:

x &= 0x8080808080808080;
return (x >>  7) | (x >> 14) | (x >> 21) | (x >> 28) |
       (x >> 35) | (x >> 42) | (x >> 49) | (x >> 56);

(assuming that the function return type is uint8_t).

You can also convert that to an unrolled loop:

uint8_t r = 0;

x &= 0x8080808080808080;

x >>= 7; r |= x;
x >>= 7; r |= x;
x >>= 7; r |= x;
x >>= 7; r |= x;
x >>= 7; r |= x;
x >>= 7; r |= x;
x >>= 7; r |= x;
x >>= 7; r |= x;
return r;

I'm not sure which will perform better in practice, though I'd tend to bet on the first - the second might produce shorter code but with a long dependency chain.

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1  
And the million-dollar question is: does gcc -msse generate pmovmskb for this code? :) –  R.. Aug 29 '12 at 15:43
    
You'll probably want to qualify that constant as ULL so the compiler doesn't try to play tricks with signed values. –  Mark B Aug 29 '12 at 15:45
    
@MarkB: That's not necessary in C++11. –  Mike Seymour Aug 29 '12 at 15:46
    
I'm pretty sure the ULL is never needed. –  R.. Aug 29 '12 at 15:46
    
It's not necessary in C99 either - since x is unsigned, even if the constant is signed it will be promoted to unsigned (this is true even if the type of the constant is wider than uint64_t). –  caf Aug 29 '12 at 15:49

First you don't really need so many operations. You can act on more than one bit at a time:

x = (x >> 7) & 0x0101010101010101; // 0x0101010101010101
x |= x >> 28;                      // 0x????????11111111
x |= x >> 14;                      // 0x????????????5555
x |= x >>  7;                      // 0x??????????????FF
return x & 0xFF;

An alternative is to use modulo to do sideway additions. The first thing is to note that x % n is the sum of the digits in base n+1, so if n+1 is 2^k, you are adding groups of k bits. If you start with t = (x >> 7) & 0x0101010101010101 like above, you want to sum groups of 7 bits, thus t % 127 would be the solution. But t%127 works only for result up to 126. 0x8080808080808080 and anything above will gives incorrect result. I've tried some corrections, none where easy.

Trying to use modulo to put us in the situation where there is just the last step of the previous algorithm to was possible. What we want is to keep the two less significant bits, and then have the sum of the other one, grouped by 14. So

ull t = (x & 0x8080808080808080) >> 7;
ull u = (t & 3) | (((t>>2) % 0x3FFF) << 2);
return (u | (u>>7)) & 0xFF;

But t>>2 is t/4 and << 2 is multiplying by 4. And if we have (a % b)*c == (a*c % b*c), thus (((t>>2) % 0x3FFF) << 2) is (t & ~3) % 0xFFFC. But we also have the fact that a + b%c = (a+b)%c if it is less than c. So we have simply u = t % FFFC. Giving:

ull t = ((x & 0x8080808080808080) >> 7) % 0xFFFC;
return (t | (t>>7)) & 0xFF;
share|improve this answer

This seems to work:

return (x & 0x8080808080808080) % 127;
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Not if you have the first bit set and thus need an answer >= 128. –  AProgrammer Aug 29 '12 at 16:19

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