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I'm bashing my head against my desk trying to figure out why this PHP code is causing this error: Undefined index: arr. I'm using Laravel, and this code works like gold outside of it, but inside Laravel, it's returning the undefined index error.

Here's the code:

function set_pilots_array($line_array)
{
    $airports = $this->airports;
    $pilots = $this->pilots;
    foreach($airports as $airport)
    {
        if($airport == $line_array[11] || $airport == $line_array[13])
        {
            if($airport == $line_array[11])
            {
                $deparr = "dep";
            }
            if($airport == $line_array[13])
            {
                $deparr = "arr";
            }
            $this->pilots[$deparr][] = array($line_array[0], $line_array[11], $line_array[13], $line_array[7], $line_array[5], $line_array[6], $line_array[8]);
        }
    }
}

function get_pilots_count()
{
    $count = count($this->pilots['dep']) + count($this->pilots['arr']);
    return $count;
}

This sort of goes with my other question: Grab and Explode Data It's pulling the data from the data file using this code:

elseif($data_record[3] == "PILOT")
{
    $code_obj->set_pilots_array($data_record);
}

Which later does this:

$code_count = $code_obj->get_pilots_count();
share|improve this question
1  
Undefined index !== Undefined constant. Your title is very misleading. –  rdlowrey Aug 29 '12 at 15:28
    
are you sure about the content of $this->pilots? does it contain the key 'arr'? –  Jan Prieser Aug 29 '12 at 15:29
    
@rdlowrey, sorry, I originally wrote this last night, and I guess it saved the title... –  Dutchcoffee Aug 29 '12 at 15:30
    
@rdlowreyThat's how laravel shows this specific error: index. And sometimes indeed it refers to an undefined constant. –  pathros Apr 13 at 0:03

3 Answers 3

You do not have $this->pilots['arr'] set. In other words, if you look at the output of var_dump($this->pilots);, you shall see there is no arr key-value pair. I suggest you this fix:

$count = count((isset($this->pilots['dep']) ? $this->pilots['dep'] : array())) + count((isset($this->pilots['arr']) ? $this->pilots['arr'] : array()));

Actually, this is not a fix - this is more like a hack. To make your code correct i suggest you to set the default values for those $pilots['arr'] and $pilots['dep'] values:

function set_pilots_array($line_array)
{
    $airports = $this->airports;
    $pilots = $this->pilots;

    foreach (array('dep', 'arr') as $key) 
    {
        if (!is_array($pilots[$key]) || empty($pilots[$key])) 
        {
            $pilots[$key] = array();
        }
    }

    // ...
}
share|improve this answer

your problem is that you are accessing all of your indexes directly without checking if they exist first.

assume that in laravel something is causing the array to not be populated.

in order to fix this, you should either iterate through the array with a foreach, or do a if(!empty($line_array[13])) {} before accessing it.

share|improve this answer

Well there is too little code to really figure out what is going on, but based on what I see:

if($airport == $line_array[13])

this condition is never being met and so $deparr = "arr"; never happens and because of this

count($this->pilots['arr']);

is giving an undefined index error

You can easily suppress this by:

$count = count(@$this->pilots['dep']) + count(@$this->pilots['arr']);
share|improve this answer
    
how do you know this condition is never met? we don't know the content of $airports nor $pilots –  Jan Prieser Aug 29 '12 at 15:30
1  
well if that condition was met, then $this->pilots[$deparr] would resolve to $this->pilots['arr'] and if it had then you would not have got undefined index: arr error... –  raidenace Aug 29 '12 at 15:31
1  
@Justin, can you print out what you get in var_dump? BTW, you can easily suppress the notice with: $count = count(@$this->pilots['dep']) + count(@$this->pilots['arr']); ` –  raidenace Aug 29 '12 at 15:45
1  
@Chris: I am aware of that general perception, Chris - even if it is not as bad as everyone makes it out to be. Have you ever read the PHP Internal Mailing List about the rationale why such a symbol even still exists in PHP Language? –  raidenace Aug 29 '12 at 18:43
1  
And the average developer has to spend hours writing check-conditions for them, actually adding layers to the actual code that he needs just because the language does not take care of it for him. And many bloggers/pundits have gone on and glorified adding all those check-conditions in your code, hence the popular perception. But the language retains the @ symbol so that he can give some leverage to normal programmers who do not want to keep writing all those additional checks - which is not as bad as everyone says it is. –  raidenace Aug 29 '12 at 19:29

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