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I have a code where I am reading from a text file and searching for a specific word (more specifically a species name such as "CH3") and then reading the data listed below it. I declare a function void read_data(char *fargs[], double *data) where fargs is an array of strings containing the filename and the species name(s) that is declared in main. Then to ensure I am finding the right species name using strstr (e.g. "CH3" not "CH3ONO2") i wrote a short loop to put spaces on either side of the species name.

char *spec;
int x;
spec[0] = ' ';
while (fargs[1][x]) {
    spec[x+1] = fargs[1][x];
    x++;
}
spec[x+1] = ' ';
spec[x+2] = '\0';

So the problem is that when I do this the program gives a Segmentation Fault later (not for strstr it works fine there with or without the loop). While when I don't include this loop and do all my manipulations on simply fargs[1] the program works but it finds the wrong species name sometimes like in the hypothetical given above. Even if I just include the loop but then never use spec again it doesn't work, which suggests to me that I'm somehow modifying fargs[1] in the loop. Also, to clarify I later use strcmp on fargs[1] so even if I just included the spaces in the declaration I would have to manipulate fargs[1] in a similar way to remove the spaces. I can totally post more code, program output, an example of the text file I'm reading from, etc. if it will help I just didn't want to post a huge wall of code and whatnot if the question could be answered without it.

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2  
It looks like you haven't declared space for spec. So any expression like spec[0] refers to random memory you don't control. –  Adrian McCarthy Aug 29 '12 at 15:33
    
And wham question answered thanks so much it works now. –  Albert Hofmann Aug 29 '12 at 15:36
    
Use a decent compiler and appropriate warning levels to tell you about uninitialized variables -- very important for someone who hasn't yet developed the ingrained habit of initializing them, as this code strongly suggests. –  Jim Balter Aug 30 '12 at 0:30

3 Answers 3

spec is never initialized, so when you read from spec in spec[0], this results in undefined behavior.

Another problem with your code is that x is never initialized.

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Actually you have created a pointer of char type which holds the address of other character or string.

But You directly strated putting the characters into that pointer thinking as it array. As array behaves like pointers but it soen't mean that what you are doing is right.

You have to use malloc(N*sizeof(char)) to hold the whole string.

So in your program may be accessing those address which it doesn't have , that's why it's giving segfault

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While looking at this code it appears to me (unless I am missing something) that you are not allocating any space to *spec, also x is never defined a value so it's completely random try this:

char *spec = NULL, *tmp;
int bff = 256, x = 0;

if(!(spec = malloc(bff)))
{
    //memory allocation failed
}
while (fargs[1][x])   
{
    if(bff <= x + 3)
    {
        bff *= 2;
        if(!(tmp = realloc(spec, bff)))
        {
            free(spec);
            //memory allocation failed
        }
        spec = tmp;
    } 
    spec[x + 1] = fargs[1][x];
    x++;
}
if(!(tmp = realloc(spec, x + 2)))
{
    free(spec);
    //memory allocation failed
}
spec = tmp;
spec[x + 1] = ' ';
spec[x + 2] = '\0';
//do what you need to do with spec
free(spec);

}

That should do the trick, it might need some tweaking though I typed this freehand in the text box but it should be a good start.

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