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How can I tee all these services into a log file:

stop service 1
stop service 2
stop service 3

I want all these services logs go to a file

should I use :

stop service 1 | tee log1.log
stop service 2 | tee log1.log
stop service 3 | tee log1.log

Or:

stop service 1 
stop service 2 
stop service 3 | tee log1.log

I haven't found a question like this Thank you!

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3 Answers 3

Another way not using tee is to simply use a bash command group with a single redirection of stdout to a log file:

{ stop service 1; stop service 2; stop service 3 } > log1.log

Use the >> operator to append to the log file, or use the &>> operator to append both stdout and stderr. It's also possible to use a bash subshell instead:

( stop service 1; stop service 2; stop service 3 ) > log1.log
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I like that solution :) +1 –  knittl Aug 29 '12 at 16:23
1  
Or a simple command group { a; b; c; } >> log1.log, which would not need a subshell to execute. Also, &>> would put both standard error and standard output in the log file, which may not be what is desired. Use >> to take just standard output. > may suffice, since we're redirecting the combined output stream to a single file in one shot. –  chepner Aug 29 '12 at 16:24
    
@chepner Taken into account. –  Herman Torjussen Aug 29 '12 at 16:35
    
Thank you all a lot, but I need to use the tee function not only to copy a log to a file but also to view it since I'm using a tool called TWS and the logs have to appear on screen. –  Juan Carlos Costilla Aug 29 '12 at 17:27
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tee accepts the -a flag to append to a file. So you should be able to redirect the output from all three commands to a single file by executing:

stop service 1 | tee log1.log
stop service 2 | tee -a log1.log
stop service 3 | tee -a log1.log

(The first command will truncate any existing file)

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{
stop service 1
stop service 2
stop service 3
} 2>&1 | tee log1.log

This treats the output of all three commands with a single redirection operation. It also includes the errors in the log file.

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