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Is there a function that generates k random numbers within a specified range. For example I want 5 random numbers between 0 to 100, with or without replacement.

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There is no built in function, but it is a rather simple one to write. Look at dynamically creating an array and the rand function. EDIT: I stand corrected look at first answer. –  sean Aug 29 '12 at 16:29
    
You mean something like this cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdlib/rand? –  Ramhound Aug 29 '12 at 16:29
    
@drescherjm - You can call it 5 times. It would generate a new random number each time. You will need to give us more to work with if you don't understand the reason your code is not working. –  Ramhound Aug 29 '12 at 16:40
    
@Ramhound. Sorry. I deleted my comment when I saw the boost answer which addresses the with or without replacement part. –  drescherjm Aug 29 '12 at 17:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You could use std::generate_n with either rand() or a generator from the new C++11 random number generators.

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C++11 random number generators: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/numeric/random/… –  paxos1977 Aug 29 '12 at 16:32

There is the Boost library, which you can use to generate random numbers, for example. The following code generates 5 random numbers from [0, 100] with replacement:

#include <vector>
#include <boost/random/mersenne_twister.hpp>
#include <boost/random/uniform_int_distribution.hpp>

const int numWantedNumbers = 5;

int main()
{
    boost::random::mt19937 generator;
    boost::random::uniform_int_distribution<> distribution(0, 100);
    std::vector<int> result;
    for (int i = 0; i < numWantedNumbers; ++i)
        result.push_back(distribution(generator));
}

If you want to generate the numbers without replacement, simply check if they are still available:

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
#include <boost/random/mersenne_twister.hpp>
#include <boost/random/uniform_int_distribution.hpp>

const int numWantedNumbers = 5;

int main()
{
    boost::random::mt19937 generator;
    boost::random::uniform_int_distribution<> distribution(0, 100);
    std::vector<int> result;
    while (result.size() < numWantedNumbers)
    {
        int number = distribution(generator);
        if (std::find(result.begin(), result.end(), number) == result.end())
            result.push_back(number);
    }
}

Note: The rejection sampling in the example without replacement has the obvious drawback that longer vectors are quite difficult to create. Just try to draw 99 out of 100 numbers, to see what I mean (or even better draw 9999 out of 10000). If this is a problem, I would suggest to create a random permutation of all possible numbers and then cut the vector at the requested size:

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
#include <boost/random/mersenne_twister.hpp>
#include <boost/random/uniform_int_distribution.hpp>

const int numWantedNumbers = 5;

int main()
{
    boost::random::mt19937 generator;
    boost::random::uniform_int_distribution<> distribution(0, 100);

    // Generate a vector with all possible numbers and shuffle it.
    std::vector<int> result;
    for (int i = 0; i <= 100; ++i)
        result.push_back(i);
    for (int i = 0; i <= 100; ++i)
    {
        int x = distribution(generator);
        std::swap(result[i], result[x]);
    }

    // Truncate to the requested size.
    result.resize(numWantedNumbers);
}

Edit based on suggestion by juanchopanza:

In C++11 manner, the last variant would look like this

#include <algorithm>
#include <random>
#include <vector>

const int numWantedNumbers = 5;

int main()
{
    std::random_device device;
    std::mt19937 generator(device());
    std::uniform_int_distribution<> distribution(0, 100);

    // Generate a vector with all possible numbers and shuffle it.
    std::vector<int> result;
    for (int i = 0; i <= 100; ++i)
        result.push_back(i);
    std::random_shuffle(result.begin(), result.end());

    // Truncate to the requested size.
    result.resize(numWantedNumbers);
}

g++-4.6 compiles it happily, if you add the -std=c++0x switch.

Edit: Make use of std::random_shuffle() (tanks to James Kanze).

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That second algorithm could be very slow, if the number of numbers needed is close to the range. A (sometimes) better solution would be to fill an std::vector with the possible values, call std::random_shuffle on it, and then take the first n. This solution could require a lot of extra memory, if the number of numbers needed is very much smaller than the range. –  James Kanze Aug 29 '12 at 16:47
    
You may want to add that most of this is available in C++11 too, see here. –  juanchopanza Aug 29 '12 at 16:47
    
@JamesKanze: I added a variant, which does not use rejection sampling. –  Mehrwolf Aug 29 '12 at 17:03
    
@juanchopanza: Thanks, added a C++11 version, too. –  Mehrwolf Aug 29 '12 at 17:03
    
@Mehrwolf And does a lot more work than necessary. And may not give a random distribution anyway. Replace the second loop with a call to std::random_shuffle. –  James Kanze Aug 29 '12 at 17:25

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