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I have:

class A{
    public:
        virtual void foo();
};

class B : public A{
    public:
        void foo();
};

B *ptr = new B();

I want to call A's foo() DIRECTLY using the 'ptr' pointer.

When I try

(A*)ptr->foo();

it still calls B's version of foo(). How do I call A's version instead?

Is this possible? What are the alternatives? Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Have a look at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scope_resolution_operator –  Pramod Aug 29 '12 at 16:37
    
Can you clarify what you mean by "didn't work"? What happens exactly when you try the above code? –  Code-Apprentice Aug 29 '12 at 16:38
3  
Doing this completely defeats the purpose of making a function virtual, so it means that the user of class A is evading the class designer's intent. This probably means there is a design error somewhere: either A doesn't provide all the functionality that's needed, or the user of A doesn't understand what A is supposed to do. –  Pete Becker Aug 29 '12 at 16:43
    
@Code-Guru: Because the member function is virtual it will get dispatched to the final overrider regardless of the static type of the pointer (i.e. the cast is useless), unless you disable dynamic dispatch for the call... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 29 '12 at 16:43
1  
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas In the OP, the function wasn't even public and so the code shouldn't have even compiled and dispatching wouldn't yet be an issue. Thus why I asked what "doesn't work" means in this situation. I'm a little perturbed that I took the time to answer the wrong question because the OP was incomplete... –  Code-Apprentice Aug 29 '12 at 16:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

When you name a function with the :: scope-resolution form, you call the named function, as though it were not virtual.

ptr->A::foo();
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3  
+1. That is correct, though it would be better if you also talk about the issue of accessibility in the OP's code. –  Nawaz Aug 29 '12 at 16:37
2  
@Nawaz: And even better if the fact that this breaks all OO principles was also mentioned :) The user of B should not care what version of foo is called, that is the main point of polymorphism. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 29 '12 at 16:44

You need to make your functions public. You do this simply by making the following change:

class A{
    public:
        virtual void foo();
};

class B : public A{
    public:
        void foo();
};

When you don't do this, the functions are automatically private and inaccessible from the "outside".

share|improve this answer
    
They are public, I just didn't specify that in the example. –  nahpr Aug 29 '12 at 16:43
3  
@nahpr For future reference, I suggest that you make a concientious effort to not introduce additional errors to the code that you post here. This will help avoid wasting your time sorting through unhelpful answers. –  Code-Apprentice Aug 29 '12 at 16:47

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