Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Which of these is correct?

var mockLogger = new Mock<EntLibLogger>();
mockLogger.Setup(i => i.CreateTracer(It.IsAny<string>()))
    .Returns((string operationName) =>
        {
            var mockTracer = new Mock<EntLibTracer>(operationName);
            mockTracer.Setup(i => i.IsTracingEnabled())
                .Returns(true);
            mockTracer.CallBase = true;

            return mockTracer.Object;
        });
mockLogger.CallBase = true;

//EntLibLogger.Current is a singleton that is shared across multiple threads.
//This Initialize method will set EntLibLogger.Current to the mocked instance
//instead of the default (non-mocked) configuration
EntLibLogger.Initialize(mockLogger.Object);

OR

var mockTracer = new Mock<EntLibTracer>(operationName);
mockTracer.Setup(i => i.IsTracingEnabled())
    .Returns(true);
mockTracer.CallBase = true;

var mockLogger = new Mock<EntLibLogger>();
mockLogger.Setup(i => i.CreateTracer(It.IsAny<string>()))
    .Returns(mockTracer.Object);
mockLogger.CallBase = true;

EntLibLogger.Initialize(mockLogger.Object);

I believe the first approach is correct but I am not sure if Moq might be doing some magic under the hood and just wanted to validate :)

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I guess the main question is what you want to happen if it calls CreateTracer twice. In the first version you'll get two different mock tracers; in the second you'll get the same one twice.

The second version is what I've usually used in jMock, EasyMock and Rhino.Mocks - but I don't have any experience with Moq, so it may be more idiomatic to use the first form there. The second is simpler though, IMO :)

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with using the second option for the simplicity. Nesten lambdas are hard to read. If you want a new one each time you could use the first option, but extract the inner expression and give it a good name. –  Torbjørn Aug 2 '09 at 8:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.