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I have a file with different lines , each line has a repeated pattern.I need a propper data structure to parse my file for example:

cluster1:gene1(genome1) gene2(genome2) gene3(genome3)
cluster2:gene4(genome4) gene5(genome5)

names are arbitary can be any thing .

I have thought a bout a hash of hash data structure

  %hoh=("cluster1" => {
        "gene1"=>"genome1"
        "gene2"=>"genome2"
        "gene2"=>"genome2"
                       },   "cluster2" => {
        "gene4"=>"genome4"
        "gene5"=>"genome5"
                       }
       )

I have 2 questions: first:how do I look for repeated pattern in each line ?

Second ,how do I make hash of hashe?

EDIT: Posted upon Zaid's request

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict; use warnings;
    my %HoH;
while(<DATA>){
    my $line=$_;
    chomp($line);
    my ( $cluster, $genes ) = split (/:/,$line);

     $HoH{ $cluster } = { split/[( )]+/ , $genes };

  }  
foreach $cluster (keys %HoH){
    print "$cluster: ";
    foreach $genes (keys %{$HoH{$cluster}}){
        print "$genes = $HoH{$cluster}{$genes} ";
    }
    print "\n";
}                                               

__DATA__
cluster1:gene1(genome1) gene2(genome2) gene3(genome3)
cluster2:gene4(genome4) gene5(genome5)
share|improve this question
    
Will the pattern always follow AAA:BBB(CCC) DDD(EEE) FFF(GGG)...? – lc. Aug 29 '12 at 17:12
    
yes ,for each line – shaq Aug 29 '12 at 17:16
1  
Have a look at perldoc perldsc. Oh, and what have you tried? – Zaid Aug 29 '12 at 17:16
    
I have written some parts , but its a bit mess , so I decided not to put the code in here – shaq Aug 29 '12 at 17:19
    
In each line I can fetch first pattern I mean for exmaple in first line gene1 and genome 1 but dont know how to go further for finding the rest and insert them as key and value in a hash – shaq Aug 29 '12 at 17:20
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Explanation to follow when OP posts their attempt:

my %HoH;

while (<>) {

    chomp;
    my ( $cluster, $genes ) = split /:/;

    $HoH{ $cluster } = { split /[( )]+/, $genes };
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Of course you don't have to split by space and parens separately since you'll end up with alternating keys and values. Much nicer than my ugly bit. – lc. Aug 29 '12 at 17:32
2  
Better use /[( )]+/ or the output of split will have some empty elements. – mob Aug 29 '12 at 17:58
    
@mob : True that. – Zaid Aug 29 '12 at 18:21
    
@ziad$HoH{ $cluster } = { split /[( )]+/, $genes }; this line has a problem I don't know what but after inserting this line the rest of my code is become like comment – shaq Aug 30 '12 at 12:23
    
@shaq : What do you mean by "become like comment"? – Zaid Aug 30 '12 at 12:37

Assuming the pattern always follows AAA:BBB(CCC) DDD(EEE) FFF(GGG)..., you can use the following algorithm:

  1. Read each line
  2. Split on :, read the first part as your key
  3. Split the remainder by spaces, then use a regex to parse, something like: ([^(]+)\(([^)])\)
  4. Create the inner hash from the captured groups in the regex
  5. Set $hoh{key from step 2} = the hash from step 4

Untested but something like the following (the hash reference thing is a bit iffy but you get the idea):

while(<>) {
    ($key, $rest) = split ':';
    @genes = split ' ', $rest;
    my %h;
    foreach $gene (@genes) {
        ($k, $v) = split /[\(\)]/, $gene;
        $h{$k} = $v;
    }
    $hoh{$key}=\%h;        
}

There's probably a more elegant PERL-y way to do this though :)

share|improve this answer
    
You should write code that is strict compliant, using lexical variables defined with my, e.g. my ($key, $rest) = ... – TLP Aug 29 '12 at 18:56
#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict; use warnings;
    my %HoH;
    while(<DATA>){
        my $line=$_;
        chomp($line);
        my ( $cluster, $genes ) = split (/:/,$line);

        $HoH{ $cluster } = { split/[( )]+/ , $genes };

    }  
    foreach my $cluster (keys %HoH){
        print "$cluster: ";
        foreach my $genes (keys %{$HoH{$cluster}}){
            print "$genes = $HoH{$cluster}{$genes} ";
        }
    print "\n";
    }                                               

__DATA__

cluster1:gene1(genome1) gene2(genome2) gene3(genome3)

cluster2:gene4(genome4) gene5(genome5)

share|improve this answer

Assuming you don't need to worry about lines that don't match your expected input, you can get away with a single split.

while( <DATA> ){
  chomp;
  next unless $_; # skip blank lines

  my($key,%value) = split /[:()\s]+/;
  $data{$key} = \%value;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have got a problem , in my file I have 1 line(just for test)but it complains that use of uninitialized value $key in hash element line (x),in file line 2 – shaq Aug 30 '12 at 18:56

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