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I'm trying to fully understand how 'extend' works in javascript.

Here's a simple extend function I found on google

function extend(child, parent) {

    var f = function() {}
    f.prototype = parent.prototype;


    var i;

    for( i in parent.prototype ) {
        child.prototype[i] = parent.prototype[i];
    }


    child.prototype.constructor = child;
    child.parent = parent;

}

it works, but I don't understand "child.prototype.constructor = child" part. The function still works without it.

What's the purpose of the line?

share|improve this question
    
This seems to be wrong. Are you sure that it is not child.prototype = new f; instead of that loop? –  Bergi Aug 29 '12 at 18:17
    
@Bergi // actually I modified it a little bit. Yes, there was child.prototype = new f; I changed ti to for(i in parent.prototype).. instead. It still deosn't explain me why I need to do "child.prototype.constructor = child" –  Moon Aug 29 '12 at 18:51
    
So why did you do that? This change makes the questioned line useless. –  Bergi Aug 29 '12 at 18:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No. Where did you find that? It mixes two approaches:

The classical prototype inheritance

function inherit(child, parent) {
    var f = function() {}
    f.prototype = parent.prototype;

    child.prototype = new f();
    child.prototype.constructor = child;
}

This function creates a new object that inherits directly from the prototype object of the parent function. It is an old-style synonym for Object.create(). With that, a prototype chain is set up - all instances of child inherit from the parent.prototype as well. Because a new object is generated to overwrite child.prototype, the "constrcutor" property needs to be updated.

The mixin inheritance

This function just loops over all properties of the parent's prototype object, and copies them onto the child's prototype object. This is quite what the common helper function extend does. It does not reset the "prototype" property of the child function, but it also does not set up a inheritance chain.

function extend(child, parent) {
    for (var i in parent.prototype ) {
        child.prototype[i] = parent.prototype[i];
    }
}

You are right, the line

child.prototype.constructor = child;

is quite useless here - the "constructor" property is not enumerable and will not be affected by the extend.

Also, your function sets a "parent" property of the child function object to the parent function, which is not required:

child.parent = parent;
share|improve this answer
    
makes sense now.. –  Moon Aug 29 '12 at 21:49
    
// I'm not sure if you're still looking at this post or not, but I have a question. Base on the inherit() code, multiple inheritance will not work. Do you know how to make it work for multiple inheritance? I can't think of anything, but mixin. –  Moon Aug 30 '12 at 23:14

It appears to me that the 'child.prototype.constructor' is a base/vanilla implementation of the object, it allows other objects to extend from it without inheriting the same parent. Hence why it is declared prior to 'child.parent = parent'.

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no. constructor is just a property, nothing more. What do you mean by "extend from it without inheriting the same parent"? –  Bergi Aug 29 '12 at 19:21

This may not directly answer your question, but I would like to reccomend you to use the extend implementation of John Resig:

It allows you to create a constructor named init, like this:

var MyClass = Class.extend({
    init: function() {
         console.log("Running a constructor");
    }
});

and instanciate objects like this (normal):

var obj = new MyClass();
share|improve this answer

This example shows how to inherit a class in javascript

var a = function(){
    // class a constructor
    this.a_priviligiate_var = 1;
}
a.prototype.a_public_var = 2;
var b = function(){
    // class b constructor
    // super call of class a constructor
    // this line makes b class to inherit all privileged vars
    b.prototype.constructor.call(this)
    this.b_priviligiate_var = 3;
}
b.prototype.b_public_var = 4;
b.prototype = new a();
var c = new b();

Defining a claas:

var a = function(){
    // class a constructor
    this.a_priviligiate_var = 1;
}
a.prototype.a_public_var = 2;

Defining another class:

var b = function(){
    // class b constructor
    // super call of class a constructor
    // this line makes b class to inherit all privileged vars
    b.prototype.constructor.call(this)
    this.b_priviligiate_var = 3;
}
b.prototype.b_public_var = 4;

Setting the super(parent) class. This line copies all b.prototype

b.prototype = new a();

Creating a instance of c

var c = new b();
share|improve this answer
    
what do you mean by 'proper'? and what's your example?? –  Moon Aug 29 '12 at 17:56
    
Javascript is a prototypal language so its just plain wrong to talk of classes. –  Christoph Aug 29 '12 at 18:40
    
...and also, the examples are wrong. b.call(this) would be enough, instead of creating new instances (including properties) Object.create(a.prototype) should be used, you set the b_public_var before overwriting the whole object, and (last but no least) there is nothing like "priviligiate variables"! –  Bergi Aug 29 '12 at 19:26
    
@Christoph - this is a long conversation about classes in js and it is too long to talk about it here –  cuzzea Aug 29 '12 at 21:32
1  
@cuzzea: There are privileged methods that can access local ("private") variables in the constructors scope. Methods on the prototype can only access public properties. –  Bergi Aug 30 '12 at 10:15

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