Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Don't know if this is possible, but I have some code like this:

val list = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12)
val evens = list.filter { e => e % 2 == 0 }

if(someCondition) {
  val result = evens.filter { e => e % 3 == 0 }
} else {
  val result = evens.filter { e => e % 5 == 0 }
}

But I don't want to iterate over all elements twice, so is there a way that I can create a "generic pick-all-the-evens numbers on this collection" and apply some other function, so that it would only iterate once?

share|improve this question
    
in your example there would only one iteration over initial list, other filters will be applied to a new filtered (smaller) collection, can you please clarify what you want to achieve –  OlegYch Aug 29 '12 at 19:52
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

If you turn list into a lazy collection, such as an Iterator, then you can apply all the filter operations (or other things like map etc) in one pass:

val list = (1 to 12).toList
val doubleFiltered: List[Int] =
  list.iterator
    .filter(_ % 2 == 0)
    .filter(_ % 3 == 0)
    .toList
println(doubleFiltered)

When you convert the collection to an Iterator with .iterator, Scala will keep track of the operations to be performed (here, two filters), but will wait to perform them until the result is actually accessed (here, via the call to .toList).

So I might rewrite your code like this:

val list = (1 to 12).toList
val evens = list.iterator.filter(_ % 2 == 0)

val result = 
  if(someCondition)
    evens.filter(_ % 3 == 0)
  else
    evens.filter(_ % 5 == 0)

result foreach println

Depending on exactly what you want to do, you might want an Iterator, a Stream, or a View. They are all lazily computed (so the one-pass aspect will apply), but they differ on things like whether they can be iterated over multiple times (Stream and View) or whether they keep the computed value around for later access (Stream).

To really see these different lazy behaviors, try running this bit of code and set <OPERATION> to either toList, iterator, view, or toStream:

val result =
  (1 to 12).<OPERATION>
    .filter { e => println("filter 1: " + e); e % 2 == 0 }
    .filter { e => println("filter 2: " + e); e % 3 == 0 }
result foreach println
result foreach println

Here's the behavior you will see:

  • List (or any other non-lazy collection): Each filter is requires a separate iteration through the collection. The resulting filtered collection is stored in memory so that each foreach can just display it.
  • Iterator: Both filters and the first foreach are done in a single iteration. The second foreach does nothing since the Iterator has been consumed. Results are not stored in memory.
  • View: Both foreach calls result in their own single-pass iteration over the collection to perform the filters. Results are not stored in memory.
  • Stream: Both filters and the first foreach are done in a single iteration. The resulting filtered collection is stored in memory so that each foreach can just display it.
share|improve this answer
    
In my tests, only "view" iterates once. When I call toIterator on a traversable collection, it iterates over the collection before I call toList. Only using "view" I've seen it iterating only after a "toList" call. But –  Maurício Szabo Oct 5 '12 at 4:00
    
+1 great answer, thanks. JVM performance is so good in general that you don't notice inefficient List operations...until you do ;-) iterator version of someList.filter(x=> otherList.contains(x.id)) is at least 2X as fast. –  virtualeyes Feb 4 at 11:22
add comment

You could use function composition. someCondition here is only called once, when deciding which function to compose with:

def modN(n: Int)(xs: List[Int]) = xs filter (_ % n == 0)

val f = modN(2) _ andThen (if (someCondition) modN(3) else modN(5))

val result = f(list)

(This doesn't do what you want - it still traverses the list twice)

Just do this:

val f: Int => Boolean = if (someCondition) { _ % 3 == 0 } else { _ % 5 == 0 }
val result = list filter (x => x % 2 == 0 && f(x))

or maybe better:

val n = if (someCondition) 3 else 5
val result = list filter (x => x % 2 == 0 && x % n == 0)
share|improve this answer
add comment

Wouldn't this work:

list.filter{e => e % 2 == 0 && (if (someCondition) e % 3 == 0 else e % 5 == 0)}

also FYI e % 2 == 0 is going to give you all the even numbers, unless you're naming the val odds for another reason.

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't someCondition be checked list.size times? –  mlatu Aug 29 '12 at 18:01
    
sure, I was under the assumption that it was just a value. If it's a function call or complex operation then the result could just be set to a val before the filter operation. –  Dan Simon Aug 29 '12 at 18:05
    
It will only be checked if the first part of the statement, e % 2 == 0 is true. –  pr1001 Aug 29 '12 at 18:07
    
@pr1001 yes, you are right, so list.size/2 times –  mlatu Aug 29 '12 at 18:12
    
I would extract the condition to something like val n = if (condition) 3 else 5; list.filter(e => e%2==0 && e%n==0) (which of course will only work if the condition is stable) –  sschaef Aug 29 '12 at 18:50
add comment

You just write two conditions in the filter:

val list = List(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12)

var result = List(0)
val someCondition = true

result = if (someCondition) list.filter { e => e % 2 == 0 && e % 3 == 0 }
         else               list.filter { e => e % 2 == 0 && e % 5 == 0 }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.