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Here is my code , I want to print 15 and 12 but due to instance member hiding the local value of a is getting printed twice.

#include <stdio.h>                                  
int a=12;             
int main()          
{           
    int a=15;             
    printf("Inside a's main local a = : %d\n",a);                  
    printf("In a global a = %d\n",a);            
    return 0;           
}

Why and is there any way to print it in c ? ... BTW I know it in c++.

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It's #include<stdio.h> in first line of code –  Omkant Aug 29 '12 at 18:05
    
@tuğrulbüyükışık: That's nonsense. –  jamesdlin Aug 29 '12 at 19:27
    
@ tuğrul büyükışık ..... That's not working how does my program know about the filename of that code itself... It will give compilation error. It's not correct –  Omkant Aug 30 '12 at 5:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Use the extern specifier in a new compound statement.

This way:

#include <stdio.h>      

int a = 12;             

int main(void)          
{           
    int a = 15;             
    printf("Inside a's main local a = : %d\n", a);

    {
        extern int a;
        printf("In a global a = %d\n", a);
    }

    return 0; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
now it shadows the inner a=15 :) what if he wants that a=15 in the innermost brackets :) –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Aug 29 '12 at 18:10
    
@tuğrulbüyükışık but not after the } of the new compound statement. –  ouah Aug 29 '12 at 18:12
    
there isnt something like "super" isnt it? Yeah i know :) –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Aug 29 '12 at 18:13
2  
@tuğrulbüyükışık this is C, not Java! ;) –  ouah Aug 29 '12 at 18:15

I think i found my answer in a way... it works

#include <stdio.h>

int a = 5;


int main()
{
    int a=10;
    if(1)
    {
        extern int a;
        printf("global: %d\n", a);
    }
    printf("local: %d\n", a);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
No need for the if(1); you can just have a simple compound statement. –  Keith Thompson Aug 30 '12 at 23:58
    
if(1)...!! for what??? –  Mr.32 Nov 8 '12 at 5:54
    
@Mr.32: Yeah I know ..but see the accepted answer please ..It's just the other way to do this.. –  Omkant Nov 8 '12 at 5:55

I know this doesn't directly answer your question, but the best way to do this is to change the name of the local variable so it doesn't conflict with the name of the global variable.

If you have control of the code inside the function (i.e., you can add an extern declaration to make the global variable visible), then you can just as easily change the name of the variable.

It's impossible to tell what name would be better. In practice, the variables will undoubtedly have more descriptive names than a. The way they're used should give you some guidance about good names for them.

If they actually serve the same purpose, they probably don't both need to exist. You might remove variable that's local to main(), or, perhaps better, remove the global and pass the local (or its address) to other functions that need to access it.

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