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I'm currently attempting to convert our page templates into OOP, and I have a feeling that what I've come up with for the navigation class isn't quite fundamentally correct.

  • Do some of these methods really belong as extension classes of drawNav?
  • Is the getMenuBar -> generateMenuBar -> generateMenuItems structure too much breakdown? Should it just be getMenuBar, and put all the content from generateMenuBar() and generateMenuItems() into getMenuBar()?

The way I call the class and methods:

$drawNav = new drawNav();

$breadcrumbTrail = $drawNav->getBreadcrumbTrail();
$menuBar = $drawNav->getMenuBar();

The code:

class drawNav { 

            public function __construct() {
                //I’ve not nothing to put here…                                
            }

            public function getMenuBar()
            {
               return $this->generateMenuBar();                          
            }

            public function getBreadcrumbTrail()
            {
                return $this->generateBreadcrumbTrail();                           
            }

            public function getSocialMediaButtons()
            {
                return $this->generateSocialMediaButtons();    
            }

            private function generateSocialMediaButtons()
            {
               //return the HTML code with the social media buttons
            }

            private function generateMenuBar()
            {
               //Generate the HTML containing the menu and social media buttons
               $this->generateMenuItems();
               $this->getSocialMediaButtons();
               //Generate the HTML closing tags for the container for the menu and social media buttons
            }

            private function generateMenuItems()
            {
                //Call to the database and generate each individual menu item and its dropdown
            }

            private function generateBreadcrumbTrail()
            {
                //Generate the HTML containing the breadcrumb trail
                $this->generateBreadcrumbs();
                //Generate the HTML closing tags for the container for the breadcrumbtrail
               }

            private function generateBreadcrumbs()
            {
                //Call to the database and generate the pieces of the breadcrumb trail
            }
}
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closed as off topic by meagar, Ash Burlaczenko, akond, Matt, Travesty3 Aug 29 '12 at 18:36

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4  
Seems like this question would go better on codereview.stackexchange.com –  Travesty3 Aug 29 '12 at 18:16
    
@Travesty3 I had thought that at first, but it seemed like there were a lot of similar questions to this one on SO –  John Aug 29 '12 at 18:16
    
If none of your methods rely on an instance of the class, why not make them static. –  John V. Aug 29 '12 at 18:20
    
@AlexLunix: Where was it mentioned that none of the methods rely on an instance of the class? –  Travesty3 Aug 29 '12 at 18:35
1  
@Travesty3 Looking at them and what they do it seems the class is more of a way of grouping them together than a class that requires an instance. And as far as we've been told there are no properties either, and nothing in the constructor. –  John V. Aug 29 '12 at 22:46
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3 Answers

Is the getMenuBar -> generateMenuBar -> generateMenuItems structure too much breakdown?

Yes. There is absolutely no reason to have a one-to-one mapping of single-line public methods wrapping your private methods. That isn't on anybody's list of best OOP practices.

Rather than this weirdness:

        public function getSocialMediaButtons()
        {
            return $this->generateSocialMediaButtons();    
        }
        // ...
        private function generateSocialMediaButtons()
        {
           //return the HTML code with the social media buttons
        }

You should simply be doing this:

        public function getSocialMediaButtons()
        {
            //return the HTML code with the social media buttons 
        }

If you are worried about being able to mix-and-match private methods within a public interface, this is trivially easy to refactor at a later date. But writing single line public methods whose only purpose is to invoke a private method with almost the exact same name is a huge code smell.

Otherwise, your code is fine, with one caveat: I hope your "return the HTML code with social media buttons" is rendering some external HTML template file, and that you're aren't writing your HTML inline inside the class. A good separation of back/front-end logic is more important than how the code part is structured; I would rather see procedural code which cleanly separates business/view logic than well crafted object-oriented code which mixes them together.

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+1 for mention of separation of code logic and templates. –  John V. Aug 29 '12 at 22:48
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I don't really see a big problem with how you have separated your methods. I personally would rather have class methods handle some specific operation and then use other methods to put together the "building block" methods into more complex operations. This makes it to where if, for example, you need to change your breadcrumb database logic, you only change it in that one method and the method is abstracted out enough form other methods to where they don't need to be changed.

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What you have seems fine.

I would question whether you have a Navigation class, as this could all be added within there, or as an extension of the Navigation class, for cleanliness.

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I do not have a navigation class, this is it. Are you suggesting then that this be called Navigation instead of drawNav? –  John Aug 29 '12 at 18:23
    
No, you could call it what you like essentially, But the naming suggested you had a navigation class as well. –  j5Dev Aug 29 '12 at 18:31
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