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I want to be able to assign a property to a function inside the function itself. I do not want to assign it to the object of invocation. So I want the equivalent of doing this:

var test  = function() {                    
    return true;         
};

test.a = 'property on a function';
alert(test.a);

Instead of this, where the property is assigned to a global object:

var testAgain = function() {
   this.a = "this property won't be assigned to the function";

   return true;  
};

testAgain();
alert(window.a);

Edit: To clarify, I'm wondering if there's something like this:

var test = function() {
   function.a = 'property on a function';
};
alert(test.a); // returns 'property on a function'

Without knowing that the function is called test or having to execute it. I know of course this isn't valid syntax

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1  
Please try to explain, i don't see what you are trying to do –  Ibu Aug 29 '12 at 18:38
    
Are you calling the function, or using the new keyword on it? –  Rocket Hazmat Aug 29 '12 at 18:38
2  
The only way for a function to get to itself (without knowing its own name) is via the deprecated arguments.callee - that's going to stop working someday too (and it may already not work in "strict" mode). –  Pointy Aug 29 '12 at 18:40
1  
It won't really work this way. Without "new" (or other trickery as Pointy explains), "this" refers to the Window. –  Ian Link Aug 29 '12 at 18:40
1  
Just set test.a inside of test? –  Rocket Hazmat Aug 29 '12 at 18:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

[is there a way to set a property on a function] without knowing that the function is called test or having to execute it.

Emphasis mine.

You can set a property on a function without knowing what its global variable name is necessarily going to be, however you do have to have a reference to the function in one way or another.

The module pattern is as close of a fit as I can think of:

window.test = (function () {
    //the function could be named anything...
    function testFn() {
        ...code here...
    }
    //...so long as the same name is used here
    testFn.foo = 'bar';
    return testFn;
}());
window.test.foo; //'bar'

The outer closure prevents testFn from being accessed anywhere globally, so all other references will have to use window.test.


This part of the answer is associated with the prior version of the question.

The simplest way of doing this is to use a named function:

var test = function testFn() {
    testFn.foo = 'bar';
    return true;
};

test.foo; //undefined
test();
test.foo; //'bar'

A better way of doing this is to use the module pattern so that you don't accidentally create issues with global leakage:

var test = (function () {
    function ret() {
        ret.foo = 'bar';
        return true;
    }
    return ret;
}());

test.foo; //undefined
test();
test.foo; //'bar'
share|improve this answer
    
The function already has a name, test. –  Rocket Hazmat Aug 29 '12 at 18:42
1  
@Rocket, no the function itself didn't have a name, the anonymous function instance was assigned to the test variable, which is not the same as having a name. The first code example wont set window.testFn (in Chrome, not sure about cross-browser compatibility on this one, which is why I recommend using a closure). –  zzzzBov Aug 29 '12 at 18:44
    
The whole point is to be able to set a property on the function without needing to know the name of the variable that happens to contain the function. –  zzzzBov Aug 29 '12 at 18:45
    
And the answer is: you can't. You need to give the function a name to be able to set a property on it. –  Rocket Hazmat Aug 29 '12 at 18:47
1  
@Rocket, As per your quote, "And the answer is: you can't. You need to give the function a name to be able to set a property on it." I was saying that there was no requirement preventing a solution where the function was given an explicit name. OP is trying to avoid knowing the name of the variable that contains the function, which does not preclude the naming of the assigned function. –  zzzzBov Aug 29 '12 at 18:53
var testAgain = function() {
    arguments.callee.a = "this property won't be assigned to the function";
    return true;  
};

testAgain();
alert(testAgain.a);​
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2  
Should probably avoid using arguments.callee now. –  Some Guy Aug 29 '12 at 18:43

You can do this by simple using the name to assign the property like this:

var test = function () {
    test.a = 'a';
    return true;
};

When test is invoked, the property will be set.

Demo

You could use arguments.callee, as su- said, but that's considered really bad practice. Also, it won't work in strict mode.

share|improve this answer
var test = function() {
    test.a = 'a';
};

Or you can use prototypes, read more here.

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