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I have a line and I want to know if it has any embedded single quote characters within it. Using awk, I have tried several variants of

badix = index($0,"\047") -- this does not find it
badix = index($0, "'") -- throws a fit
badix = index($0, "\'") -- throws a fit
badix = index($0, \') -- throws a fit

This is for awk on Solaris 10, so gawk solutions won't apply in this case.

Any suggestions?

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1  
Have you tried with \x27? –  newfurniturey Aug 29 '12 at 19:17

3 Answers 3

You've got a shell quoting issue, where I suspect you are enclosing the awk command in single quotes, which cannot themselves include a single quote, even if escaped. Try $'...' quoting, which can include an escaped single quote:

awk $'{
    # Lots of other awk code...

    badix=index($0, "\'") }'

    # The rest of the awk code
   }'
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2  
+1) didn't know about $'...' - very useful, thx. –  Theodros Zelleke Aug 29 '12 at 19:49
    
Actually, this is a single line in a much larger awk script, which is called by a bash script. the awk script already has the syntax awk '{a whole bunch of awk code ... this line of awk code ... morw awk code }'. Tried your syntax without the awk, but it threw an error. –  JimR Aug 29 '12 at 20:27
    
So you have something like awk -f myscript.awk in your bash script, and nothing except awk commands in myscript.awk? –  chepner Aug 29 '12 at 20:35
1  
That's a Bashism, though. Ok for a question tagged bash but perhaps worthy of a small caveat. –  tripleee Aug 29 '12 at 20:36
    
@JimR - based on your comment, it sounds like you are still passing the script to awk as a command-line argument, in which case the entire script must still be quoted properly. –  chepner Aug 29 '12 at 21:31

You should use:

badix = index($0, "'"'"'"); 
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This worked perfectly, thanks. –  JimR Aug 29 '12 at 19:59

Here's a few ways:

Put the awk script in a separate file which you run with -f, in which case you avoid shell quotes, thus "'" will work

$ cat awkscript
#!/bin/awk -f
BEGIN{print "'"}
$ awk -f awkscript </dev/null
'
$ chmod +x awkscript
$ ./awkscript </dev/null
'

Run it from a shell, where you enclose the script in ' quotes, end the ' quote, concat a literal ' quote, then start a new ' quote.

awk 'BEGIN{print "'\''"}' </dev/null

Use nawk instead, which is installed as /usr/xpg4/bin/awk. It is posix compliant and much less useless.

PATH=/usr/xpg4/bin:$PATH
awk -v q=\' 'BEGIN{print q}'
awk 'BEGIN{print "\x27"}'
awk 'BEGIN{print "\047"}'
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Actually, this is a single line in a much larger awk script, which is called by a bash script. the awk script already has the syntax awk '{a whole bunch of awk code ... this line of awk code ... morw awk code }'. Surprised to learn that nawk is called awk in xpg4. Will play with this a bit more tomorrow. –  JimR Aug 29 '12 at 20:58

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