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The following code sum up my problem :

template<class Parameter>
class Base {};

template<class Parameter1, class Parameter2, class Parameter>
class Derived1 : public Base<Parameter>
{ };

template<class Parameter1, class Parameter2, class Parameter>
class Derived2 : public Base<Parameter>
{
public :
    // Copy constructor
    Derived2(const Derived2& x);

    // An EXPLICIT constructor that does a special conversion for a Derived2
    // with other template parameters
    template<class OtherParameter1, class OtherParameter2, class OtherParameter>
    explicit Derived2(
        const Derived2<OtherParameter1, OtherParameter2, OtherParameter>& x
    );

    // Now the problem : I want an IMPLICIT constructor that will work for every
    // type derived from Base EXCEPT
    // Derived2<OtherParameter1, OtherParameter2, OtherParameter> 
    template<class Type, class = typename std::enable_if</* SOMETHING */>::type>
    Derived2(const Type& x);
};

How to restrict an implicit constructor to all classes derived from the parent class excepted the current class whatever its template parameters, considering that I already have an explicit constructor as in the example code ?

EDIT : For the implicit constructor from Base, I can obviously write :

template<class OtherParameter> Derived2(const Base<OtherParameter>& x);

But in that case, do I have the guaranty that the compiler will not use this constructor as an implicit constructor for Derived2<OtherParameter1, OtherParameter2, OtherParameter> ?

EDIT2: Here I have a test : (LWS here : http://liveworkspace.org/code/cd423fb44fb4c97bc3b843732d837abc)

#include <iostream>
template<typename Type> class Base {};
template<typename Type> class Other : public Base<Type> {};
template<typename Type> class Derived : public Base<Type>
{
    public:
        Derived() {std::cout<<"empty"<<std::endl;}
        Derived(const Derived<Type>& x) {std::cout<<"copy"<<std::endl;}
        template<typename OtherType> explicit Derived(const Derived<OtherType>& x) {std::cout<<"explicit"<<std::endl;}
        template<typename OtherType> Derived(const Base<OtherType>& x) {std::cout<<"implicit"<<std::endl;}
};
int main()
{
    Other<int> other0;
    Other<double> other1;
    std::cout<<"1 = ";
    Derived<int> dint1;                     // <- empty
    std::cout<<"2 = ";
    Derived<int> dint2;                     // <- empty
    std::cout<<"3 = ";
    Derived<double> ddouble;                // <- empty
    std::cout<<"4 = ";
    Derived<double> ddouble1(ddouble);      // <- copy
    std::cout<<"5 = ";
    Derived<double> ddouble2(dint1);        // <- explicit
    std::cout<<"6 = ";
    ddouble = other0;                       // <- implicit
    std::cout<<"7 = ";
    ddouble = other1;                       // <- implicit
    std::cout<<"8 = ";
    ddouble = ddouble2;                     // <- nothing (normal : default assignment)
    std::cout<<"\n9 = ";
    ddouble = Derived<double>(dint1);       // <- explicit
    std::cout<<"10 = ";
    ddouble = dint2;                        // <- implicit : WHY ?!?!
    return 0;
}

The last line worry me. Is it ok with the C++ standard ? Is it a bug of g++ ?

share|improve this question
    
Why would a constructor called with a Derived2<OtherParameter1, OtherParameter2, OtherParameter> argument prefer your implicit rather than explicit constructor since the template instantiation for the implicit constructor is more general than the explicit constructor? –  Jason Aug 29 '12 at 19:33
    
current class and // Derived2<OtherParameter1, OtherParameter2, OtherParameter> can be different... –  ForEveR Aug 29 '12 at 19:34
    
If for the implicit constructor I write : template<class Other> Derived2(const Base<Other>& x) do I have the garantee that Derived2<OtherParameter1, OtherParameter2, OtherParameter> will never be implicitely converted ? –  Vincent Aug 29 '12 at 19:35
    
Yes, of course they can (or typically will be) different, but wouldn't a Derived2<...> instance better match a Derived2<...> argument compared to a general type T? Doesn't the C++ compiler look for the least-generalized template for instantiation? –  Jason Aug 29 '12 at 19:36
2  
@ForEveR: With the explicit constructor, I think it's more like this: liveworkspace.org/code/e48a3b5f1e670f785e68db4e67739b44 –  Jason Aug 29 '12 at 19:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Since each of the constructors you are referencing are templated class methods, the rules of template instantiation and function overload resolution are invoked.

If you look in section 14.8.3 of the C++11 standard, there are actually some examples in paragraphs 1-3 that somewhat demonstrate your question. Basically put, the C++ compiler will look for the best-match or "least generalized" template function instantiation among a series of overloaded template functions (with conversions of types added if necessary). In your case, because you have explicitly created a constructor that takes an alternate instantiation of a Derived2 object, that constructor will be a preferred overload for any Derived2<...> type compared to one that takes either a generic type T, or even a Base<OtherParameter> argument.

UPDATE: Apparently, according to 12.3.1/2 in the C++11 standard,

An explicit constructor constructs objects just like non-explicit constructors, but does so only where the direct-initialization syntax (8.5) or where casts (5.2.9, 5.4) are explicitly used.

The implications are that if you do not use the direct-initialization syntax for constructing your objects or opt for a cast, then you cannot use any constructors that are marked as explicit. This explains the puzzling results you're seeing between test #9 and #10.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that when one uses copy-initialization (as opposed to direct-initialization) to construct another Derived2<> instance, the implicit constructor will still be called even though that's not what's desired here. Online demo. Is this a bug in GCC 4.7.1? –  ildjarn Aug 29 '12 at 20:20
    
@Jason I added a test and the result seems different compared to what you say. –  Vincent Aug 29 '12 at 20:30
    
The "problem" is that you've labled your copy-constructor as explicit, which, it seems GCC is taking literally, meaning that unless you explicitly call the copy-constructor through direct initialization, it won't call it, and will fall-back to an alternative candidate for a copy-constructor. In your case that's the "implicit" templated copy-constructor. I'm not sure if that's a bug in GCC or not. It would seem to me like it's a bug, but maybe there is something in the standard they're explicitly conforming to. –  Jason Aug 29 '12 at 22:07
    
As a quick follow-up to my above comment, you get your assumed behavior if you remove the explicit keyword from your constructor: liveworkspace.org/code/4eda4a95dde4c345b1ffb543a4b0504f –  Jason Aug 29 '12 at 22:08
    
Okay, apparently this behavior is per the standard, at least according to 12.3.1/2. –  Jason Aug 29 '12 at 22:34

You could write a trait that reports whether or not a type is a specialization of Derived2<>:

template<typename T>
struct is_derived2 : std::false_type { };

template<class P1, class P2, class P>
struct is_derived2<Derived2<P1, P2, P>> : std::true_type { };

And a function stub to extract the P in Base<P>:

template<typename Parameter>
Parameter base_parameter(Base<Parameter> const&);

Then change your implicit constructor to:

template<
    class T,
    class = typename std::enable_if<
        !is_derived2<T>::value
        && std::is_base_of<
            Base<decltype(base_parameter(std::declval<T>()))>,
            T
        >::value
    >::type
>
Derived2(const T& x);

Online demo: http://liveworkspace.org/code/c43d656d60f85b8b9d55d8e3c4812e2b


Update: Here is an online demo incorporating these changes into your 'Edit 2' link:
http://liveworkspace.org/code/3decc7e0658cfd182e2f56f7b6cafe61

share|improve this answer

Ok, maybe I've found a workaround that only imply the addition of a "fake" constructor :

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
template<typename Type> class Base {};
template<typename Type> class Other : public Base<Type> {};
template<typename Type> class Derived : public Base<Type>
{
    public:
        Derived() {std::cout<<"empty"<<std::endl;}
        Derived(const Derived<Type>& x) {std::cout<<"copy"<<std::endl;}
        template<typename OtherType> explicit Derived(const Derived<OtherType>& x) {std::cout<<"explicit"<<std::endl;}
        template<typename Something> Derived(const Something& x) {std::cout<<"implicit"<<std::endl;}

    // Workaround
    public:
        template<template<typename> class Something, typename OtherType,
        class = typename std::enable_if< std::is_same< Something<OtherType>, Derived<OtherType> >::value>::type >
        Derived(const Something<OtherType>& x)
        {std::cout<<"workaround (for example always false static assert here)"<<std::endl;}
};
template<unsigned int Size> class Test {};

int main()
{
    Other<int> other0;
    Other<double> other1;
    Test<3> test;
    std::cout<<"1 = ";
    Derived<int> dint1;                     // <- empty
    std::cout<<"2 = ";
    Derived<int> dint2;                     // <- empty
    std::cout<<"3 = ";
    Derived<double> ddouble;                // <- empty
    std::cout<<"4 = ";
    Derived<double> ddouble1(ddouble);      // <- copy
    std::cout<<"5 = ";
    Derived<double> ddouble2(dint1);        // <- explicit
    std::cout<<"6 = ";
    ddouble = other0;                       // <- implicit
    std::cout<<"7 = ";
    ddouble = other1;                       // <- implicit
    std::cout<<"8 = ";
    ddouble = ddouble2;                     // <- nothing (normal : default assignment)
    std::cout<<"\n9 = ";
    ddouble = Derived<double>(dint1);       // <- explicit
    std::cout<<"10 = ";
    ddouble = dint2;                        // <- workaround
    std::cout<<"11 = ";
    ddouble = test;                         // <- implicit
    return 0;
}

@Everybody : Do you think that it's a good solution to that problem ?

LWS : http://liveworkspace.org/code/f581356a7472c902b10ca486d648fafc

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this is a good solution, simply because no "workaround" is actually needed. If a workaround is what you want, then your question didn't make that clear. :-] –  ildjarn Aug 29 '12 at 22:03
    
Maybe I am wrong, but I think that I can put the number of parameter that I want. The workaround case will only be considered by the compiler if Something have the same number of argument as Derived. Then it will test if Something = Derived and in that case, I have an implicit constructor that will display a "false" static assertion. –  Vincent Aug 29 '12 at 22:05
    
Wouldn't you rather have overload resolution do the right thing than giving a static assert though? –  ildjarn Aug 29 '12 at 22:22
    
Of course, generally it would be the case. But in my real application, I just want to block that conversion and force the user to be aware of what he is doing by calling the explicit constructor. –  Vincent Aug 29 '12 at 22:32

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