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Why do I get the following to errors when I try to add ref to an overloaded method's parameter?

The best overloaded method match for 'WindowsFormsApplication1.Form1.SearchProducts(int)' has some invalid arguments

Argument 1: cannot convert from 'ref System.Collections.Generic.List' to 'int'

Here's some (simplified) code:

public virtual IList<int> SearchProducts(int categoryId)
{
    List<int> categoryIds = new List<int>();
    if (categoryId > 0)
        categoryIds.Add(categoryId);
    return SearchProducts(ref categoryIds);
}

public virtual IList<int> SearchProducts(ref IList<int> categoryIds)
{
    return new List<int>();
}

Edit:

Some of you asked me why I need ref in this case and the answer is that I probably don't need it, because I can clear the list and add new elements (I don't need to create a new reference). But the question is not about the fact that I need or don't need ref, it's about why I got the errors. And since I didn't find an answer (after googling for little while) I thought the question was interesting and worth asking here. It seems that some of you don't think it's a good question and voted to close it down ...

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Ed S., Jon Skeet, goric, Pierre-Luc Pineault, flx Mar 4 '14 at 1:59

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
What are you trying to do? It's not clear why you need to use ref in this case – Claudio Redi Aug 29 '12 at 19:45
    
@ClaudioRedi: The OP clearly stated that the code has been simplified. How he is using ref is tangential to the topic. – Ed S. Aug 29 '12 at 19:46
    
@Ed S.: since I was here, just wanted to check if he's misunderstanding what ref would do. It seems to me that he's misusing it so I could remove his problem removing ref in first place :) – Claudio Redi Aug 29 '12 at 19:53
    
@ClaudioRedi: Sure, it's a good comment (and I thought the same), but he said it has been simplified so I figured i'd leave it alone. That said... I didn't need to comment back at you either :D – Ed S. Aug 29 '12 at 19:53
    
@ClaudioRedi I probably don't need ref, but that's not what the question is about (see edit). – david.s Aug 29 '12 at 20:42
up vote 8 down vote accepted

When you pass an argument by reference, the compile-time type has to be the exact same type as the parameter type.

Suppose the second method was written as:

public virtual IList<int> SearchProducts(ref IList<int> categoryIds)
{
    categoryIds = new int[10];
    return null;
}

That must compile, as int[] implements IList<int>. However, it would break type safety if the caller actually had a variable of type List<int>, which now had a reference to an int[]...

You can fix this by making the declared type of categoryIds in the calling method IList<int> instead of List<int> - but I strongly suspect you don't actually want to pass the argument by reference in the first place. It's relatively rare to need to do so. How comfortable are you with C# parameter passing?

share|improve this answer
    
@EdS.: There's a surprise :) I've voted to close now too, but I'll leave this answer in case it's helpful to the OP to see it applied in his context. – Jon Skeet Aug 29 '12 at 19:52
    
Yeah I actually removed the comment and upvoted because it is simpler and complimentary – Ed S. Aug 29 '12 at 19:53
    
I upvoted but then read Ed S. response and darnit Skeet, you have enough points already! :P Not that sharing with Eric Lippert is particularly spreading the wealth.. heh – Jimmy Hoffa Aug 29 '12 at 19:53
    
@JonSkeet What you suspect is right, so thanks for pointing out that I don't actually want to pass the argument by reference in the first place. (see edit) – david.s Aug 29 '12 at 20:46

Try the following:

public virtual IList<int> SearchProducts(int categoryId)
{
    IList<int> categoryIds = new List<int>();
    if (categoryId > 0)
    categoryIds.Add(categoryId);
    return SearchProducts(ref categoryIds);
}
share|improve this answer

You need to pass the method an assignable IList(of int).

IList<int> categoryIds = new List<int>();
share|improve this answer

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