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Say I have an $input array, that contains something like this :

array
  0 => string 'a' (length=1)
  1 => string 'b' (length=1)
  2 => string 'c' (length=1)
  3 => string 'd' (length=1)
  4 => string 'e' (length=1)
  5 => string 'f' (length=1)
  6 => string 'g' (length=1)
  7 => string 'h' (length=1)
  8 => string 'i' (length=1)
  9 => string 'j' (length=1)

I want to get an $output array, that would contain this :

array
  0 => string 'a' (length=1)
  1 => string 'c' (length=1)
  2 => string 'e' (length=1)
  3 => string 'g' (length=1)
  4 => string 'i' (length=1)

The $output array contains half the values that were in $input ; those that had even numbered keys in the input; the first one is kept, second one is not, third one is, and so one...

(Note: the keys are not preserved ; only the values are important)

How could I do that ? Keeping only one on two values of the array ?


I have already tried some ideas, and already have a couple different solutions :

First idea: iterate over the input array, and copy the interesting values to the output array:

$input = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', );
$output = array();

$nbr = count($input);
for ($i = 0 ; $i < $nbr ; $i += 2) {
    $output[] = $input[$i];
}

var_dump(array_values($output));

Second idea: iterate over the array, and unset what I don't want to keep:

$input = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', );
$output = $input;

$nbr = count($input);
for ($i = 1 ; $i < $nbr ; $i += 2) {
    unset($output[$i]);
}

var_dump(array_values($output));

Third idea: use a combinaison of array_flip, range, array_diff_key, ... :

$input = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', );
$output = array();

$keys_to_exclude = array_flip(range(1, count($input)-1, 2));
$output = array_diff_key($input, $keys_to_exclude);

var_dump(array_values($output));

Fourth idea: about the same thing, but with array_intersect_key:

$input = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', );
$output = array();

$keys_to_include = array_flip(range(0, count($input)-1, 2));
$output = array_intersect_key($input, $keys_to_include);

var_dump(array_values($output));

Any other idea ? Even / particularly if it sounds kinda hacky or anything ?

My goal is not to get the most efficient nor simple syntax ; it's just for fun and because I am curious, actually ^^

If the title is not using the right words to describe what I want, don't hesitate to tell ; or edit it :-)

share|improve this question
    
I edited the title and description of the algorithm a little as requested. Personally I'd use the first idea - it's simple and fairly clear what you're doing. –  therefromhere Aug 2 '09 at 10:27
    
Thanks for the edits :-) Well, actually, "how can I do that whithout looping by myself" is a question that poped-up at work couple of days ago ; a colleague and I thought about it... and we finally used the "for" solution (the first one I gave) : less fun, but easier to understand when someone will have to maintain our code -- and that's one of the most important thing in our job ; but, it was still an interesting question, and I thought I might get some funny/interesting propositions here ^^ –  Pascal MARTIN Aug 2 '09 at 10:45
    
+1 for well-formulated question with own ideas –  PatrikAkerstrand Aug 2 '09 at 11:27

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted
<?php
$x = range('a', 'f');

$x = array_map('array_shift', 
       array_chunk($x, 2)
     );

var_dump($x);

or another one

<?php
class ArrayEvenIterator extends ArrayIterator {
    public function next() {
    	parent::next();
    	return parent::next();
    }
}

$x = range('a', 'f');
$x = iterator_to_array(new ArrayEvenIterator( $x ), false);

var_dump($x);

or with a php 5.3 closure (which isn't better than global in this case ;-) )

<?php
$x = range('a', 'f');

$x = array_filter( $x, function($e) use(&$c) { return 0===$c++%2; });

var_dump($x);
share|improve this answer
    
Nice ones too! thanks :-) didn't think about using a closure (my mind is not yet used to those in PHP, I guess ^^ (and I can't use PHP 5.3 as much as I'd like :-( )) –  Pascal MARTIN Aug 2 '09 at 11:19
1  
+1 for using closures and for the iterator_to_array (that I didn't know of). –  Luiz Damim Feb 5 '10 at 19:45

Assuming numeric keys:

foreach ($array as $key => $value) {
    if ($key % 2 != 0) {
        unset($array[$key]);
    }
}


EDIT

Here goes my slightly more insane solution which keeps the index continuous without re-indexing. ;o)

foreach ($array as $key => $value) {
    if (!($key%2)) {
        $array[$key/2] = $value;
    }
}
$array = array_slice($array, 0, ceil(count($array)/2));
share|improve this answer
    
@Pascal (OP): I have to admit this is not so terrifically different from your for solution, but I think you covered almost all bases already yourself. Most sane solutions should pretty much only differ in syntactic sugar. :) –  deceze Aug 2 '09 at 10:51
    
This is what I was going to suggest as well. If keys are not numeric you could perhaps run the array through a function and create a new array of elements with numeric keys. Each element would then be an array of the key/value pair from the original array. The nice thing about the Modulus operator is that it can be used to find all sorts of number of elements. To find every 5th element if ($key % 5 == 0) This means divide by 5 and return remainder. A list 0 through 15 elements would return 0, 5, 10, and 15 each of which return a remainder of 0 when divided by 5. e.g 10/5 = 2 R0. –  Gordon Potter Aug 2 '09 at 11:01
    
@deceze : yep, you're right, there is no "miracle" AND maintenable solution ^^ But that's were the fun is ;-) Thanks anyway, didn't think about the modulus! –  Pascal MARTIN Aug 2 '09 at 11:12
1  
Note that this version preserves the input keys ( [0] => a [2] => c [4] => e [6] => g [8] => i ) , which might well be useful, but doesn't match the specified output. Using array_values($array) on the output would achieve this of course. –  therefromhere Aug 2 '09 at 11:32
    
I really don't care about the keys in this situation ; but that's good to know in case I need those some day. Thanks! –  Pascal MARTIN Aug 2 '09 at 15:00

If you're using PHP 5.3 or later, or have the SPL extension installed (you will by default on PHP 5), you can use the FilterIterator and ArrayObject classes.

class EvenKeysFilter extends FilterIterator
{
    private function iseven($keyval)
    {
        return (($keyval % 2) == 0);
    }

    public function accept()
    {
        $keyval = $this->getInnerIterator()->key();
        return ($this->iseven($keyval));
    }
}

$input = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', );
$inputobj = new ArrayObject($input);   

$evenFilterIter = new EvenKeysFilter($inputobj->getIterator());    
$output = iterator_to_array($evenFilterIter, false);

print_r($output);

(Props to VolkerK for pointing out iterator_to_array())

Which correctly outputs this:

Array
(
    [0] => a
    [1] => c
    [2] => e
    [3] => g
    [4] => i
)
share|improve this answer
    
Don't know why, but I think I love this one ! Wouldn't probably use it in an application someone else will have to maintain, but I definitly like it (and didn't think about SPL). Thanks :-) (just a '(' that has to be removed in the accept method, and then it works) –  Pascal MARTIN Aug 2 '09 at 11:11
    
I agree, SPL is probably overkill for this case, but stuff like RecursiveIteratorIterator is invaluable. –  therefromhere Aug 2 '09 at 11:18
    
It's just too bad that people (including myself, actually) generally don't use the SPL enough :-( –  Pascal MARTIN Aug 2 '09 at 15:01
    
+1 for the cleverness use of SPL. I need to pay more attention to it :) –  Luiz Damim Feb 5 '10 at 19:49

Not necessarily the most efficient method, but since you mentioned that wasn't necessarily a requirement...

flip, filter, then flip back.

<?php
    function even($var)
    {
        return(!($var & 1));
    }

    $input = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', );
    $flipped = array_flip($input);
    $filtered = array_filter($flipped, 'even');
    $output = array_flip($filtered);
?>
share|improve this answer
1  
This might produce unexpected/unintuitive results depending on the input. E.g. $input = array('a', 'a', 'b'); -> $output==array('b') –  VolkerK Aug 2 '09 at 10:38

create a wrapper function

function getInput($i)
{
     global $input;
     return $input[$i*2];
}

The smallest and most efficient I guess.

share|improve this answer
2  
It certainly is small, but what's it do? –  deceze Aug 2 '09 at 10:30
3  
yuck, globals! :P –  therefromhere Aug 2 '09 at 10:44
  function dropHalf($a){
     $f=0;
     foreach($a as $k=>$v)
       if($f = ! $f)
         unset($a[$k]);
     return $a;
  }

That's the smallest version I could think off.

share|improve this answer
    
Aren't you missing something? –  deceze Aug 2 '09 at 10:28
1  
your if statement wont work buddy. –  Ayaz Alavi Aug 27 '10 at 6:55

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