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I am trying to see if there are other ways of coding this code sample more efficiently. Here, y is an 1xM matrix, (say, 1x1000), and z is an NxM matrix, (say, 5x1000).

mean(ones(N,1)*y.^3 .* z,2)

This code works fine, but I worry if N increases a lot, that the ones(N,1)*y.^3 might get too wasteful and make everything slow down.

Thoughts?

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mathworks.com/matlabcentral/answers/… –  user1401864 Aug 29 '12 at 22:26
    
^Looks like either the same 2 people visit the site, or someone's stealing questions/answers –  user1401864 Aug 29 '12 at 22:27
    
My answer in both cases. And people frequently ask the same question on both sites. –  user85109 Aug 29 '12 at 22:49
    
@LucasKeaton I ask questions on multiple sites. –  Learnaholic Aug 29 '12 at 22:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Its not THAT terrible for a matrix that small. Many times you can gain from the use of bsxfun on problems like this. Here the matrices are simply too small to really gain anything.

>> N = 5;M =1000;
>> y = rand(1,M);
>> z = rand(N,M);
>> mean(ones(N,1)*y.^3 .* z,2)
ans =
      0.12412
      0.11669
      0.12102
      0.11976
      0.12196

>> mean(bsxfun(@times,y.^3,z),2)
ans =
      0.12412
      0.11669
      0.12102
      0.11976
      0.12196

>> z*y.'.^3/M
ans =
      0.12412
      0.11669
      0.12102
      0.11976
      0.12196

As you can see, all three solutions return the same result. All are equally valid.

Now I'll compare the times required.

>> timeit(@() mean(ones(N,1)*y.^3 .* z,2))
ans =
   0.00023018

>> timeit(@() mean(bsxfun(@times,y.^3,z),2))
ans =
   0.00026829

>> timeit(@() z*y.'.^3/M)
ans =
   0.00016594

As I said, you don't gain much. In fact, bsxfun does not gain at all, and is even a bit slower. But you can gain a bit, if you re-write the expression into the third form I've posed. Not much, but a bit.

Edit: if N is large, then the timing changes a bit.

>> N = 2000;M = 1000;
>> y = rand(1,M);
>> z = rand(N,M);
>> timeit(@() mean(ones(N,1)*y.^3 .* z,2))
ans =
     0.034664

>> timeit(@() mean(bsxfun(@times,y.^3,z),2))
ans =
     0.012234

>> timeit(@() z*y.'.^3/M)
ans =
    0.0017674

The difference is the first solution explicitly creates an expanded y.^3 matrix. This is inefficient.

The bsxfun solution is better, because it never explicitly forms the expand y.^3 matrix. But it still forms a product matrix that is N by M. So this solution still must grab and fill a large chunk of memory.

You should understand why the matrix-vector multiply is the best in all cases. No large matrix is ever formed. Since * is simply a dot product (thus a sum of products) it must be more efficient. Then I divide by M after the fact to create the desired mean.

A minor improvement over the last...

>> timeit(@() z*(y.*y.*y).'/M)
ans =
    0.0015793

which gains slightly over the power op.

And timeit? This comes from the File Exchange, a terribly useful utility written by Steve Eddins to time code fragments.

share|improve this answer
    
Woodchips, yes I thought about using bsxfun. How is the timing if the N was very large, say, 2000 or something like that? (timeit is your own function?) –  Learnaholic Aug 29 '12 at 21:28
    
Note that Steve's timeit utility is better than tic and toc, since timeit carefully reduces/eliminates many of the common sources of timing errors in MATLAB. Find it behind the link I've provided. –  user85109 Aug 29 '12 at 21:45
    
Thanks that has helped me a lot. –  Learnaholic Aug 29 '12 at 23:04

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