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I am trying to compare SSE float[4] addition to standard float[4] addition. As a demo I compute the sum of the summed components, with and without SSE:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

struct Point4
{
  Point4()
  {
    data[0] = 0;
    data[1] = 0;
    data[2] = 0;
    data[3] = 0;
  }

  float data[4];
};

void Standard()
{
  Point4 a;
  a.data[0] = 1.0f;
  a.data[1] = 2.0f;
  a.data[2] = 3.0f;
  a.data[3] = 4.0f;

  Point4 b;
  b.data[0] = 1.0f;
  b.data[1] = 6.0f;
  b.data[2] = 3.0f;
  b.data[3] = 5.0f;

  float total = 0.0f;
  for(unsigned int i = 0; i < 1e9; ++i)
  {
    for(unsigned int component = 0; component < 4; ++component)
    {
      total += a.data[component] + b.data[component];
    }
  }

  std::cout << "total: " << total << std::endl;
}

void Vectorized()
{
  typedef float v4sf __attribute__ (( vector_size(4*sizeof(float)) ));

  v4sf a;
  float* aPointer = (float*)&a;
  aPointer[0] = 1.0f; aPointer[1] = 2.0f; aPointer[2] = 3.0f; aPointer[3] = 4.0f;

  v4sf b;
  float* bPointer = (float*)&b;
  bPointer[0] = 1.0f; bPointer[1] = 6.0f; bPointer[2] = 3.0f; bPointer[3] = 5.0f;

  v4sf result;
  float* resultPointer = (float*)&result;
  resultPointer[0] = 0.0f;
  resultPointer[1] = 0.0f;
  resultPointer[2] = 0.0f;
  resultPointer[3] = 0.0f;

  for(unsigned int i = 0; i < 1e9; ++i)
  {
    result += a + b; // Vectorized operation
  }

  // Sum the components of the result (this is done with the "total += " in the Standard() loop
  float total = 0.0f;
  for(unsigned int component = 0; component < 4; ++component)
  {
    total += resultPointer[component];
  }
  std::cout << "total: " << total << std::endl;
}

int main()
{

//  Standard();

  Vectorized();

  return 0;
}

However, the code seems to be faster (~.2 seconds) with the standard method than with the vectorized (~.4 seconds) method. Is it because of the for loop to sum the v4sf values? Is there a better operation I can use to time the difference between these two techniques and still compare the output to make sure there were no differences between the two?

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1  
.2 and .4 seconds seem to be quite low for uncertainty errors. How did you measure it? Make sure that you only measure the test loop in-program, not the whole program runtime, which includes lots of other stuff. Also make sure that your compiler is properly configured to properly use the intrinsics and take care of alignment. –  PlasmaHH Aug 29 '12 at 20:50
    
Optimisations on? –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Aug 29 '12 at 20:50
    
I compiled with -O3. @PlasmaHH they are low, but I did it 5x each and they were pretty constant. By "use the intrinsics", do you mean use -msse2? (I did). I just used 'time' from a terminal to time them - one time(s) compiled with only the Vectorized() call in main uncommented, and the other time(s) with only the Standard() call in main uncommented. –  David Doria Aug 29 '12 at 20:59
    
The SSE part of your vectorized loop is insignificant compared to the rest of the loop (one SSE arithmetic instruction versus > 10 scalar instructions). –  Paul R Aug 29 '12 at 21:04
    
time from the terminal isn't a good way to profile things. Use a proper profiler. –  Cornstalks Aug 29 '12 at 21:09

1 Answer 1

Then reason your version is slower as SSE is that you have to unpack from an SSE register to a scalar register 4 times every iteration, which has more of an overhead than what you gain from the vectorized addition. Look at the disassembly and you should get a clearer picture.

I think what you want to do is the following (which is faster with SSE):

for(unsigned int i = 0; i < 1e6; ++i)
{
    result += a + b; // Vectorized operation
}

// Sum the components of the result (this is done with the "total += " in the Standard() loop
for(unsigned int component = 0; component < 4; ++component)
{
    total += resultPointer[component];
}

Also the following might be even faster:

for(unsigned int i = 0; i < 1e6/4; ++i)
{
    result0 += a + b; // Vectorized operation
    result1 += a + b; // Vectorized operation
    result2 += a + b; // Vectorized operation
    result3 += a + b; // Vectorized operation
}

// Sum the components of the result (this is done with the "total += " in the Standard() loop
for(unsigned int component = 0; component < 4; ++component)
{
    total += resultPointer0[component];
    total += resultPointer1[component];
    total += resultPointer2[component];
    total += resultPointer3[component];
}
share|improve this answer
    
I get the first version - that makes sense, I'll try it out. But I don't understand what is going on in the second version? Why are you doing the same thing 4 times in the first loop? –  David Doria Aug 29 '12 at 21:39
    
Ok, I'm really confused now. Using your first suggested method (ideone.com/N4rHy), here are my timings: With -msse2 Vectorized() : 1.7s Standard() : 4.0s This is what I'd expect - great! However, WithOUT -msse2 Vectorized() : 15.4s Standard() : 7.4s Why is this backwards? I would expect pretty much the same performance without -msse2 from Vectorized() and Standard(), would you not? –  David Doria Aug 29 '12 at 22:36
    
actually, I just realized I am not getting the same result. Vectorized() outputs "total: 5.70425e+08", while Standard() outputs "total: 2.5e+10". –  David Doria Aug 30 '12 at 1:52
    
I thought I found the problem - 'result' was not initialized to zero. But even after adding: resultPointer[0] = 0.0f; resultPointer[1] = 0.0f; resultPointer[2] = 0.0f; resultPointer[3] = 0.0f; , the output of Vectorized() is unchanged (and different from Standard() ). –  David Doria Aug 30 '12 at 13:33
    
Gahhh there was a huge bug (the nested loops in the Standard() function had the same counter name), but even with that fix (edited in the original post), the outputs are still different. I stepped through a few iterations and they both seem to be working correctly - is there some kind of overflow problem or something? –  David Doria Aug 30 '12 at 13:41

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