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I am dealing with trying to chunk up items in a custom collection class that implements IEnumerable (and ICollection) in C# 2.0. Let's say, for example, that I only want 1000 items at a time and I have 3005 items in my collection. I've got a working solution that I demonstrate below, but it seems so primitive that I figure there has to be a better way to do this.

Here's what I have (for example's sake, I'm using C# 3.0's Enumerable and var, just replace those references with a custom class in your mind):

var items = Enumerable.Range(0, 3005).ToList();
int count = items.Count();
int currentCount = 0, limit = 0, iteration = 1;

List<int> temp = new List<int>();

while (currentCount < count)
{
    limit = count - currentCount;

    if (limit > 1000)
    {
        limit = 1000 * iteration;
    }
    else
    {
        limit += 1000 * (iteration - 1);
    }
    for (int i = currentCount; i < limit; i++)
    {
        temp.Add(items[i]);
    }

    //do something with temp

    currentCount += temp.Count;
    iteration++;
    temp.Clear();
}

Can anyone suggest a more elegant way of doing this in C# 2.0? I know if this project was from the past 5 years I could use Linq (as demonstrated here and here). I know my method will work, but I'd rather not have my name associated with such ugly (in my opinion) code.

Thanks.

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closed as off topic by Servy, cadrell0, Tim Schmelter, dtb, C. A. McCann Sep 5 '12 at 15:17

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If your existing code works then this should be on a site such as programmers or code review, not here on stackoverflow. –  Servy Aug 29 '12 at 21:00
    
Ah, I didn't know about the code review site until you mentioned it. I'll post it there too, thanks. –  Sven Grosen Aug 29 '12 at 21:02
    
You shouldn't cross post questions. You should delete the question here (or wait for it to be closed) if you're going to re-post it. –  Servy Aug 29 '12 at 21:03
    
Link to your other question though, as I was part way through writing an answer here. –  Jon Hanna Aug 29 '12 at 21:05
    
Ah, I just added. We can move the whole thing. Edit: Or we could, but codereview isn't in the list of sites it suggests moving it to :( –  Jon Hanna Aug 29 '12 at 21:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Firstly . yield is your friend here, and it was introduced with 2.0. Consider:

public static IEnumerable<List<T>> Chunk<T>(IEnumerable<T> source, int chunkSize)
{
  List<T> list = new List<T>(chunkSize);
  foreach(T item in source)
  {
    list.Add(item);
    if(list.Count == chunkSize)
    {
      yield return list;
      list = new List<T>(chunkSize);
    }
  }
  //don't forget the last one!
  if(list.Count != 0)
    yield return list;
}

Then we're flexible in type and size, so it's nicely reusable. The only that being restricted to 2.0 means, is that we can't make it an extension method.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, this is just what I needed. I feel ashamed for not remembering that I still had access to generics and yield in C# 2.0, especially since I just finished Jon Skeet's C# in Depth 2nd Edition last week. I still had to massage the data a little bit to get it to work with the API I have to use, but this got me most of the way there. Thanks. –  Sven Grosen Aug 29 '12 at 21:33
    
I was such a field for writing IEnumerator and IEnumerable implementations in 1.1, that it's a change I'll never forget. –  Jon Hanna Aug 29 '12 at 21:37
1  
I need to use yield more. :) Like this implementation just because this does not hold up the processing of list when list.Count hits chunkSize. It's also loosely coupled since the ProcessChunk(items) call is not in it. Very nice. –  hIpPy Aug 29 '12 at 21:53
    
@hIpPy What was going to be the "secondly" in this answer, but I decided to leave it, was to yield a call to a method that yields individual items, so that Chunk becomes IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>>. If you want to stretch your yield skillz, then implementing that is a worthwhile exercise - just complicated enough to need a bit of stretching, without being crazy. –  Jon Hanna Aug 29 '12 at 22:13

There are several ways you could approach this.

If you just want to associate each item with the index of the chunk it belongs to:

int processed = 0;
foreach (int item in items)
{
    int chunkIndex = processed++ / CHUNK_SIZE;
    ProcessItem(item, chunkIndex);
}

If you want to process items in batches, but don't need the whole chunk collection at once:

int processed = 0, count = items.Count;
List<int> chunk = new List<int>(CHUNK_SIZE);
foreach (int item in items)
{
    chunk.Add(item);
    if (++processed % CHUNK_SIZE == 0 || processed == count) {
        ProcessChunk(chunk);
        chunk.Clear();
    }
}

If you want to have all chunks as a list of lists:

int processed = 0, count = items.Count;
List<List<int>> chunks = new List<List<int>>();
foreach (int item in items)
{
    int chunkIndex = processed++ / CHUNK_SIZE;
    if (chunks.Count == chunkIndex) {
        chunks.Add(new List<int>(CHUNK_SIZE));
    }

    chunks[chunkIndex].Add(item);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your answer was good, but the answer provided by @Jon Hanna was a little more elegant (and potentially more reusable). –  Sven Grosen Aug 30 '12 at 18:30

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