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I have a Subscription model with a created DateTimeField. The Subscriptions last one year from the date it was created. I also have a expired field. Not 100% sure if I want to have it as a DateTimeField() or a Boolean yet. I digress. What I want to be able to do is basically check/ keep track of when a Subscription will expire.

If anyone could offer any insight how to do this I'd be very greatful.

class Subscription(models.Model):
    user = models.ForeignKey(User)
    subscribed = models.BooleanField(default=False)
    created = models.DateTimeField(auto_now_add=True)
    updated = models.DateTimeField(auto_now=True)
    expired = models.DateTimeField()

    def expiration(self):
         date = created + datetime.timedelta(365).isoformat()
         return self(expired=date) 

error: 'datetime.timedelta' object has no attribute 'isoformat'

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What is happening when you try the current code? Are you getting an exception, bad data or something else? –  Blckknght Aug 29 '12 at 21:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

See https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/db/models/#overriding-predefined-model-methods:

updated

because you cannot use self.created in the setting of expired.

models.py

class Subscription(models.Model):
    user = models.ForeignKey(User)
    subscribed = models.BooleanField(default=False)
    created = models.DateTimeField(auto_now_add=True)
    updated = models.DateTimeField(auto_now=True)
    expired = models.DateTimeField()

    def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self.expired = datetime.datetime.now()+datetime.timedelta(365) # original answer used this line: self.created + datetime.timedelta(365).isoformat()
        super(Subscription, self).save(*args, **kwargs) # Call the "real" save() method.
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This is brilliant. Thank you! –  Modelesq Aug 29 '12 at 21:22
2  
Why can't the OP use self.created? The problem in his original code was that the was using created instead of self.created, which is undefined. Additionally, your code here will reset the expiration for another full year each time the model is saved, which almost assuredly not what the OP wants. –  Chris Pratt Aug 29 '12 at 21:26
    
What if 365 days spans a leap day? –  Steven Rumbalski Aug 31 '12 at 14:58

Your date calculation is calling isoformat on the timedelta instance you are creating, which I suspect is where your error is coming from.

I think you just need some parentheses (and self):

date = (self.created + datetime.timedelta(365)).isoformat()
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What if 365 days spans a leap day? –  Steven Rumbalski Aug 31 '12 at 14:57
1  
Well, personally I'd just ignore leap days, since the expiration date probably doesn't need to be exactly a full year from the start of the subscription (365 days is probably good enough). If it was determined to be important, @karthirkr's suggestion of using the relativedelta class from the dateutil module is probably the best answer. –  Blckknght Aug 31 '12 at 17:29

Assuming you're going to stick with expired being a DateTimeField on the model, then what you really want to do is override clean

def clean(self):
    if self.expired is None:
        self.expired = self.created + timedelta(days=365)
    return super(Subscription, self).clean()
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What if 365 days spans a leap day? –  Steven Rumbalski Aug 31 '12 at 14:57
    
I was using the user's current code. Perhaps the OP doesn't care if there's a leap day. It was not the focus of the question, and he didn't provide enough detail to make a determination that it should be done a different way. –  Chris Pratt Sep 4 '12 at 14:14

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