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Consider the following Employee class and a subclass called Manager-

public class Employee
{
    private String name;

    public Employee(String name)
    {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public String getInfo()
    {
        return name;
    }
}

public class Manager extends Employee
{
    public Manager(String name)
    {
        super(name);
    }
}

In another class, I have defined two functions as follows-

import java.util.ArrayList;

public class WildCardsAndTypeVariables
{
    public static <T extends Employee> void displayInfo(ArrayList<T> employees)
    {
        for (int i=0; i<employees.size(); i++)
        {
                Employee employee = (Employee) employees.get(i);
                System.out.println(employee.getInfo());
        }
    }

    public static void displayInfo2(ArrayList<? extends Employee> employees)
    {
        for (int i=0; i<employees.size(); i++)
        {
                Employee employee = (Employee) employees.get(i);
                System.out.println(employee.getInfo());
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
    Employee e1 = new Employee("John");
    Employee e2 = new Employee("Joe");
    Employee e3 = new Manager("Joseph");

    ArrayList<Employee> employees = new ArrayList<Employee>();
    employees.add(e1);
    employees.add(e2);
    employees.add(e3);

    displayInfo(employees);
    displayInfo2(employees);
   }
}

I get the same output from displayInfo() and displayInfo2().

So, considering this example, what is the difference between wildcards and type variables?

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3 Answers 3

In a case like this where the method takes only one parameter and has a void return type you don't gain any benefit or really any difference in semantics between the wildcard type version and the generic method version. The real power of generic methods comes when you use the type variable more than once in the method signature (parameter types or return type), a trivial example being

public static <T extends Employee> T firstEmployee(ArrayList<T> employees) {
  return employees.get(0);
}

Which says "this method takes an ArrayList whose members are all instances of some subclass of Employee (or Employee itself) and the value it returns is an instance of the same class". This is something you can't express using just wildcards.

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There are a lot of problems with your example.

In displayInfo2, you should use ? extends Employee, as you are reading, not writing, Employee objects in the passed array. For example, if you wanted to pass an array of Manager to that method, it would not type-check until you made this correction.

Once that's fixed, you should not need to cast your calls to employees.get() in either method.

The difference is simply that you gave the unknown type a name (T) in displayInfo. Certain situations in Java require you to have a name for the type (I'll keep editing this post with links), but in this particular example, you are fine with just a wildcard, as all you care about is the Employee part.

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When you use type (example T), you will be able to send ONLY that particular type of Concrete object.

But, when you use wild cards, you are defining bounds of the objects. So, you can pass objects of type T (or) any object of type T.

In your case you have just Empoylee, so not a big difference. But let us say you have class Contractor which extends Employee. Then you will see the difference.

share|improve this answer
    
Update: I added class Manager which extends Employee –  CodeBlue Aug 29 '12 at 21:35
    
Now create a list of type Manager and try to pass it displayinfo2() –  Nambari Aug 29 '12 at 21:40
    
That gave an error. Why? –  CodeBlue Aug 29 '12 at 21:43
    
By the way another thing I have observed is, <T extends Employee> in display1(), this says "T" could Employee are any subclass of employee. –  Nambari Aug 29 '12 at 21:45
    
That errors because display2() accepts only type of emplpoyee (or) super class of employee. –  Nambari Aug 29 '12 at 21:46

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