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class Game {
  private:
    string title;
    bool running;
    State currentState;

  public:
    sf::RenderWindow window;
    void setup();
    void run();
};

I have a variable called currentState. This is State:

#ifndef STATE_HPP
#define STATE_HPP

using namespace std;

class State {
  private:

  public:
    void start();
    void update();
    void render();
};

#endif

And then I have a class called PlayState, which inherits State:

#ifndef PLAY_STATE_HPP
#define PLAY_STATE_HPP

#include <SFML/Graphics.hpp>

#include "Game.hpp"
#include "State.hpp"

using namespace std;

class PlayState : public State {
  private:
    sf::CircleShape shape;
    Game game;

  public:
    PlayState();
    void start();
    void update();
    void render();
};

#endif

On my Game.cpp, I am creating currentState, by doing:

currentState = PlayState();

The problem is, though, that it's not working. currentState.update() is state.update(). It seems that I am not overriding the State methods when I create PlayState.

Here's PlayState.cpp:

#include <SFML/Graphics.hpp>
#include <SFML/Window.hpp>
#include <stdio.h>

#include "PlayState.hpp"

PlayState::PlayState() {
  printf("heyyy\n");
}

void PlayState::start() {
  shape.setRadius(100.f);
  shape.setOrigin(20.0f, 20.0f);
  shape.setFillColor(sf::Color::Green);
}

void PlayState::update() {
  sf::Event event;
  while (game.window.pollEvent(event)) {
    if (event.type == sf::Event::Closed) {
      game.window.close();
      //running = false;
    }
  }

  printf("here\n");
}

void PlayState::render() {
  printf("here\n");
  game.window.clear();
  game.window.draw(shape);
  game.window.display();
}

Any ideas about how I can 'override' those methods? Thank you.

EDIT I had to make State.cpp functions virtual so that they can be overriden. I also had to define State *currentState as a pointer and create PlayState with "currentState = new PlayState();". Also, now I access .update and .draw with ->update() and ->draw().

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3  
You need a virtual function in order to override anything. Anything else is just hiding. –  chris Aug 29 '12 at 21:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Two problems. As @McAden said, the functions in State that are to be overridden in PlayState need to be marked virtual. The other problem is that the data member currentState in Game has type State. When you assign an object of type PlayState to it, it gets the State part of the PlayState object, but not the derived parts. This is called "slicing". To prevent it, make currentState a pointer to State, and when you create that PlayState object, assign its address to the Game object's currentState.

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That was it, thanks a bunch :) (edited answer with fixes) –  David Gomes Aug 29 '12 at 22:28

What you're looking for is the concept of virtual functions.

Wikipedia entry

State needs:

virtual void update();

PlayState needs:

void update();
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override is C++11 so you may not have that in your compiler yet. –  Johan Lundberg Aug 29 '12 at 21:34
1  
sorry, brain fart - I've been spending too much time in C#. I corrected it. –  McAden Aug 29 '12 at 21:35
    
you can not write public like that –  Johan Lundberg Aug 29 '12 at 21:35

You need to make your function's with the virtual modifier ie.

virtual void Update();

When calling currentState->Update() this will call the topmost overridden function, if you desire to call any of the parent classes functions inside of the classes methods simply specify ie. State::Update(); when calling the function.

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