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I have 3 tables:

shops, PRIMARY KEY cid,zbid
shop_items, PRIMARY KEY id
shop_inventory, PRIMARY KEY id

shops a is related to shop_items b by the following: a.cid=b.cid AND a.zbid=b.szbid shops is not directly related to shop_inventory

shop_items b is related to shop_inventory c by the following: b.cid=c.cid AND b.id=c.iid

Now, I would like to run a query which returns a.* (all columns from shops). That would be:

SELECT a.* FROM shops a WHERE a.cid=1 AND a.zbid!=0

Note that the WHERE clause is necessary.

Next, I want to return the number of items in each shop:

SELECT
  a.*,
  COUNT(b.id) items
FROM shops a
LEFT JOIN shop_items b ON b.cid=a.cid AND b.szbid=a.zbid
WHERE a.cid=1
GROUP BY b.szbid,b.cid

As you can see, I have added a GROUP BY clause for this to work.

Next, I want to return the average price of each item in the shop. This isn't too hard:

SELECT
  a.*,
  COUNT(b.id) items,
  AVG(COALESCE(b.price,0)) average_price
FROM shops a
LEFT JOIN shop_items b ON b.cid=a.cid AND b.szbid=a.zbid
WHERE a.cid=1
GROUP BY b.szbid,b.cid

My next criteria is where it gets complicated. I also want to return the unique buyers for each shop. This can be done by querying shop_inventory c, getting the COUNT(DISTINCT c.zbid). Now remember how these tables are related; this should only be done for the rows in c which relate to an item in b which is owned by the respective shop, a.

I tried doing the following:

SELECT
  a.*,
  COUNT(b.id) items,
  AVG(COALESCE(b.price,0)) average_price,
  COUNT(DISTINCT c.zbid)
FROM shops a
LEFT JOIN shop_items b     ON b.cid=a.cid AND b.szbid=a.zbid
LEFT JOIN shop_inventory c ON c.cid=b.cid AND c.iid=b.id
WHERE a.cid=1
GROUP BY b.szbid,b.cid

However, this did not work as it messed up the items value. What is the proper way to achieve this result?

I also want to be able to return the total number of purchases made in each shop. This would be done by looking at shop_inventory c and adding up the c.quantity value for each shop. How would I add that in as well?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this solution:

SELECT    a.*,
          COALESCE(b.item_cnt,  0) AS item_cnt,
          COALESCE(b.avg_price, 0) AS avg_price,
          COALESCE(b.buyer_cnt, 0) AS buyer_cnt
FROM      shops a
LEFT JOIN (
          SELECT    a.cid, 
                    a.szbid, 
                    COUNT(*)     AS item_cnt, 
                    AVG(a.price) AS avg_price,
                    b.buyer_cnt
          FROM      shop_items a
          LEFT JOIN (
                    SELECT   cid,
                             iid,
                             COUNT(DISTINCT zbid) AS buyer_cnt
                    FROM     shop_inventory
                    WHERE    cid = 1
                    GROUP BY cid, 
                             iid
                    ) b ON a.cid = b.cid AND a.id = b.iid
          WHERE     a.cid = 1 AND
                    a.szbid <> 0
          GROUP BY  a.cid,
                    a.szbid
          ) b ON a.cid = b.cid AND a.zbid = b.szbid
WHERE     a.cid = 1 AND 
          a.zbid <> 0
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the detailed query, spent the last 20 minutes trying to work out how it functions and I'm still slightly confused. In the innermost LEFT JOIN, you get the value buyer_cnt. Now this is a different value returned for each item. So why is it, in the outermost LEFT JOIN, that b.buyer_cnt works? Surely it should have to SUM(b.buyer_cnt)? –  Keir Simmons Aug 29 '12 at 22:13
    
Actually, what I don't understand is how the innermost JOIN uses a.id=b.iid, when there are many a.ids returned by the outer query (except they have been grouped). –  Keir Simmons Aug 29 '12 at 22:21
    
@KeirSimmons since shop_items seems to have a one-to-many relationship with shop_inventory, we have to first do an inner GROUP BY on shop_inventory (using cid and iid) so as to ensure that only one row joins for each cid -> szbid combination in the shop_items table. This way, we don't skew the aggregations by duplicating rows in the outer GROUP BY on shop_items. –  Zane Bien Aug 29 '12 at 22:44

Instead of COUNT(DISTINCT c.zbid) + LEFT JOIN shop_inventory you could write a subselect:

SELECT
  a.*,
  COUNT(b.id) items,
  AVG(COALESCE(b.price,0)) average_price,

  ( SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT c.zbid)
    FROM shop_inventory c
    WHERE c.cid=b.cid AND c.iid=b.id
  )

FROM shops a
LEFT JOIN shop_items b     ON b.cid=a.cid AND b.szbid=a.zbid
WHERE a.cid=1
GROUP BY b.szbid,b.cid
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this works as well :) . –  Keir Simmons Aug 29 '12 at 22:35

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