Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got some data sent via a server, formatted like this:

[
  {"Username":"user1@domain.com", "id":1},
  {"Username":"user2@domain.com", "id":2},
  {"Username":"user3@domain.com", "id":3}
]

I bind it to a table, but I'd like the ability to add a class to the table row when the checkbox is checked (to indicate it's been selected). Here's what will eventually work, and I know the problem is that Selected is not a property currently in my data.

<table>
    <tbody data-bind="foreach: Items">
        <tr data-bind="css:{selected: Selected}">
            <td>
                <input type='checkbox' data-bind="attr:{name: id}, checked: Selected" />
            </td>
            <td data-bind="text: Username"> </td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>​

Since the concept of Selected is something purely for the UI, it seems a little dumb to have the server send that over the wire for each item in my data.

What I want to happen is basically this: http://jsfiddle.net/xSSMX/ but without having to add the observable Selected property on each item.

How can I add a property to each existing item in my data to achieve this?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could just use map to add the field to the array that you get from the server like this...

data = data.map(function(item) {
            item.Selected = ko.observable(false);
            return item;
        });

Which will add Selected on to each item. Although if I'm not mistaken map isn't supported in all browsers so you'd have to add support which you could do with a function similar to the one found here... http://www.tutorialspoint.com/javascript/array_map.htm. Or you could achieve the same effect using jQuery's $.each.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this answer because I don't have to change my data, but I'm a little worried about performance and looping through every returned item. Will this be performant enough for possibly hundred (maybe up to 1500) items? –  Chris Barr Aug 30 '12 at 13:37
    
It should be performant enough considering how little is actually being done in the loop. The only other alternative would be to edit/reproduce all knockout bindings to behave the way you want when encountering a property that is not on the viewmodel, aka assume it's false when not found but if it needs to be set to true and it doesn't exist add it to the view model. I might throw together an example of what I mean a little later today. –  MHollis Aug 30 '12 at 14:30
    
Hmm, ok thanks. I may end up doing more within the map function (since this was just a small bit of code for an example), so that's why I was wondering. So far I'm using it and it's working will with about 200 items. –  Chris Barr Aug 30 '12 at 14:45

When the server sends over the data, you can create a userModel(id, userName). This model by default will have selected on false. I included a jsFiddle to make this a bit more clear.

http://jsfiddle.net/xSSMX/1/

share|improve this answer
    
This would work really well, I just don't like the fact that I would have to change the data server-side to suit the needs of something I'm doing in the UI here. –  Chris Barr Aug 30 '12 at 14:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.