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When I compile the following snippet with g++

template<class T>
class A
{};

template<class T>
class B
{
    public:
        typedef     A<T>            A;
};

the compiler tells me

error: declaration of ‘typedef class A<T> B<T>::A’
error: changes meaning of ‘A’ from ‘class A<T>’

On the other hand, if I change the typedef to

        typedef     ::A<T>          A;

everything compiles fine with g++. Clang++ 3.1 doesn't care either way.

Why is this happening? And is the second behavior standard?

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1  
It must be warning level which by default shows it as an error. The same as you can have a function missing return and can be reported as an error or warning. In general, I would avoid declaring type A as a A<T>. It will be confusing later on. –  Grzegorz Aug 29 '12 at 22:56
    
I don't know what the standard says, but I am happy that g++ complains... that's just silly. –  Karoly Horvath Aug 29 '12 at 22:59
    
I think it's neither silly, nor confusing. I run into this problem quite often. As for warning to error conversion, I'm not giving g++ any flags, what warnings does it convert to errors by default? –  foxcub Aug 29 '12 at 23:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

g++ is correct and conforming to the standard. From [3.3.7/1]:

A name N used in a class S shall refer to the same declaration in its context and when re-evaluated in the completed scope of S. No diagnostic is required for a violation of this rule.

Before the typedef, A referred to the ::A, however by using the typedef, you now make A refer to the typedef which is prohibited. However, since no diagnostic is required, clang is also standard conforming.

jogojapan's comment explains the reason for this rule. Take the following change to your code:

template<class T>
class A
{};

template<class T>
class B
{
    public:
        A a; // <-- What "A" is this referring to?
        typedef     A<T>            A;
};

Because of how class scope works, A a; becomes ambiguous.

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3  
@foxcub: In the second form you're not referring to A, you're referring to ::A. The second form is correct. –  Kevin Ballard Aug 29 '12 at 23:13
1  
Interesting, but still mysterious. Why doesn't the meaning of A change? Before the typedef, it means the same thing as ::A, i.e., a template class. After the typedef, it means a very concrete class, a specific instantiation of ::A, namely, ::A<T>. I'm glad to hear that the second form is sound, but help me understand. –  foxcub Aug 30 '12 at 0:18
1  
foxclub is right that there is something strange about how GCC handles this. Firstly, typedef ::A<T> A does change the meaning of A, just like typedef A<T> A does. Secondly, if you do typedef int X; on the global level, and then typedef float X; inside the class definition, this changes the meaning of X, but there is no problem whatsoever. Using typedef to redefine the meaning of a name in a separate scope (in this case, the class scope) is perfectly fine. (Of course it is also confusing and I wouldn't recommend doing it.) –  jogojapan Aug 30 '12 at 3:46
1  
@JesseGood (about the first comment) I agree the word meaning is vague and perhaps inappropriate in this context. But still, if you do typedef ::A<T> A;, and then later (e.g. somewhere in a member function, possibly outside the class definition) do A a;, then this A will refer to the typename ::A<T>, no longer to the template name ::A, so it's changed. Or perhaps I misunderstand what to refer to means in this case. –  jogojapan Aug 30 '12 at 4:23
1  
@JesseGood (about the Ideone example) Yes! Actually, this example is what I think the standard quote is actually about: X is defined as float in the class, and because of how class scope works (which is what §3.3.7/1 is about), that definition must extend to the entire class scope, including separately defined member functions, and including anything found before the actual typedef. So the declaration X x becomes ambiguous. (You get the same problem if you have typedef ::A<T> A; and put a member A a; (or A<T> a;) before the typedef.) –  jogojapan Aug 30 '12 at 4:28

I will add to Jesse's answer about the seemingly peculiar behavior of GCC in compiling:

typedef       A<T>          A;

vs

typedef     ::A<T>          A;

This also applies to using statements as well of the form:

using A =   A<T>;
using A = ::A<T>;

What seems to be happening within GCC, is that during the compilation of the typedef/using statement declaring B::A, that the symbol B::A becomes a valid candidate within the using statement itself. I.e. when saying using A = A<T>; or typedef A<T> A; GCC considers both ::A and B::A valid candidates for A<T>.

This seems odd behavior because as your question implies, you don't expect the new alias A to become a valid candidate within the typedef itself, but as Jesse's answer also says, anything declared within a class becomes visible to everything else inside the class - and in this case apparently even the declaration itself. This type of behavior may be implemented this way to permit recursive type definitions.

The solution as you found is to specify for GCC precisely which A you're referring to within the typedef and then it no longer complains.

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