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I'm trying to solve a problem where i have a list of coordinates and want to get the closest to a point.

Example: I got the coordinates [[1,2],[3,4],[10,3]] and want to get the closest point to the origin [0,0]. [1,2] in this example.

I wrote this:

list_min([H|T], Min):-
   list_min(T, H, Min).

list_min([], H, H).

list_min([L|Ls], Min0, Min) :-
    point(P),
    distance(Min0,P,D0),
    distance(L,P,D1),
    Lower is min(D0, D1),
    assert(candidate(Min0)),
    assert(candidate(L)),
    forall(candidate(X),distance(X,P,Lower)),
    retractall(candidate(_)),
    list_min(Ls, X, Min).

distance(A,B,D):-
    A = [A1,A2],
    B = [B1,B2],
    Y is B2 - A2,
    X is B1 - A1,
    D is sqrt(X*X + Y*Y).

However, looks like it always fail in forall line. What i'm doing wrong? Is there a better way for doing this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I propose a solution without the suggested library or the quadtree, I stay in basic prolog (I write in SWI).

There is actually no need for assert/retract/forall if I understand your problem correctly. I assume that point(P) says that P is the uniquely-defined reference point from which we calculate distances, but it is a bit weird (I would use it as a parameter, to ensure it is unique).

point([0,0]). % The reference point

% Entry point predicate
% First parameter : a list of points
% Second parameter (result) : the point closest to the reference point
list_min([H|Tail], Min) :-
  point(Reference),
  distance(H, Reference, D),
  list_min(Tail, H, D, Min).

% First parameter : the list remaining to consider
% Second parameter : the closest point, at this point of the computation
% Third parameter : the corresponding (minimum) distance, at this point of the computation
% Fourth parameter : the result (one point, to be bound at the end of computation)
list_min([], CurrentMin, _, CurrentMin). % Stop condition : list processed
list_min([Candidate|Tail], CurrentMin, CurrentDist, Min) :-
  point(Reference),
  distance(Candidate, Reference, CandidateDist),
  (
   % if the new candidate is not better, keep the current candidate
   CurrentDist < CandidateDist ->
   list_min(Tail, CurrentMin, CurrentDist, Min)
  ;
   % if the new candidate is better, take it as the current candidate
   list_min(Tail, Candidate, CandidateDist, Min) 
   ).

distance(A,B,D):- % copy-pasted from your version
  A = [A1,A2],
  B = [B1,B2],
  Y is B2 - A2,
  X is B1 - A1,
  D is sqrt(X*X + Y*Y).
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With SWI-Prolog, You can also use a functionnal style :

:- use_module(library(lambda)).


point([0,0]). % The reference point

% Entry point predicate
% First parameter : a list of points
% Second parameter (result) : the point closest to the reference point
list_min([H|Tail], Min) :-
  point(Reference),
  distance(H, Reference, D),

  foldl(\X^Y^Z^(distance(X, Reference, DX),
                Y = [Cur_D, _Cur_P],
                (   DX < Cur_D
                ->  Z = [DX, X]
                ;   Z = Y)),
    Tail, [D, H], Min).


distance(A,B,D):- % copy-pasted from your version
  A = [A1,A2],
  B = [B1,B2],
  Y is B2 - A2,
  X is B1 - A1,
  D is sqrt(X*X + Y*Y).
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you can use library(aggregate):

distance_min(L, MinXY) :-
    distance_min(L, 0, 0, MinXY).
distance_min(L, X0, Y0, MinXY) :-
    aggregate(min(D, [X,Y]),
              (member([X,Y], L), D is sqrt((X-X0)^2+(Y-Y0)^2)),
              MinXY).

test:

?- distance_min([[1,2],[3,4],[10,3]], R).
R = min(2.23606797749979, [1, 2]).

edit

....
assert(candidate(Min0)),
assert(candidate(L)),
forall(candidate(X),distance(X,P,Lower)),
retractall(candidate(_)),
...

I didn't commented your code, but here now a hint: these lines are really in bad style, and really useless. Admitting forall/2 succeds, what outcome do you expect?

Anyway, forall/2 fails because Lower it's already instanced from a statement above (Lower is min(D0, D1)), thus distance/3 will fail where D don't match.

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Use a quad-tree for 2D http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quadtree

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Really a weird answer: quadtrees are useful in some context, but really useless here. Did you mean K-D-Trees with K=2? –  CapelliC Aug 31 '12 at 6:51

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