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If I have one base class and I derive 10 different concrete derived classes from it then will each and every concrete derived class have a different vtable?

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What language/runtime/compiler etc.? –  Andrew Hare Aug 2 '09 at 12:02
    
My guess is C++. It is the only popular language which has both virtual and non-virtual methods. –  EFraim Aug 2 '09 at 12:03
    
Why is this tagged as subjective? –  the_drow Aug 2 '09 at 12:05

2 Answers 2

If the base class or all of the derived classes have any virtual functions, then yes, usually. Why is it important?

Two classes can only share a vtable if they have an indentical set of virtual functions. So a derived class can only share a vtable with a base class if it doesn't override any virtual functions.

A derived class can't share a vtable with any other derived class unless they both don't override any functions of the same base class as - even if implemented in the same way - the member functions of one derived class are a different type from the member functions of a different derived class.

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i was just confused that whether all the derived classes gonna use a single v table or they gonna have different –  zznn Aug 2 '09 at 12:04
    
yes indeed every derived class is over riding the virtual functions of their own since the base class is purely abstract so are there gonna b seprate v tables??? –  zznn Aug 2 '09 at 12:05
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They can only share a vtable if they have an indentical set of virtual functions. This means that a derived class can only share a vtable with a base class if it doesn't override any virtual functions. –  Charles Bailey Aug 2 '09 at 12:05
    
thanks alot.................... –  zznn Aug 2 '09 at 12:08
    
Two classes can never share the vtable. This table contains not only pointers to virtual members, but also the information needed by RTTI. –  AProgrammer Aug 2 '09 at 12:34

Depends on whether your derived classes override/declare any virtual methods.

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