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I have a collection. I want to select values that matches 2 conditions.

var a;
var b;
foreach(SomeObject so in collection)
{
    if(so.Value == something) 
    {
        a = so;
        // break if b is not null.
    }
    else if(so.Value == somethingElse) 
    {
        b = so;
        // break if a is not null
    }
}

Is it possible to do the above using linq iterating over the collection only once? There will be only one value of something and one value of somethingElse, if we can use that fact.

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1  
Can you post the code you've written? –  TheEvilPenguin Aug 29 '12 at 23:50
    
I have no code now, but I have updated the question with what I want to do. –  Sam Aug 29 '12 at 23:57
    
Why do you want to do this? In your example code above, the values of a and b will get set to the last object to meet their criteria. Is that OK? –  Matt Greer Aug 29 '12 at 23:59
5  
You should really have a go at it first. People aren't here to write your code for you, we're here to help you with code you can't get working. This sounds kind of like a homework problem you just want the answer to. –  TheEvilPenguin Aug 30 '12 at 0:00
    
What is the types of your collection? –  horgh Aug 30 '12 at 0:01

6 Answers 6

var relevant =
  from so in l where so.Value == something || so.Value == somethingElse
  group so by so.Value == something into grp
  select new {ForA = grp.Key, SO = grp.First()};
foreach(var bit in relevant)
  if(bit.ForA)
    a = bit.SO;
  else
    b = bit.SO;

It could gain you something against some sources, in that only two items are retrieved, though if against a collection in memory I'd stay with what you had, but adding a catch so that once you'd set both a and b, you stopped looping rather than kept needlessly examining the collection.

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This solution narrows the list down to two elements and then goes from there. Take(2) is used so the collection only gets searched until the two values are found.

var matches = collection.Where(x => x.Value == something || x.Value == somethingElse)
                        .Take(2)
                        .ToList();
var a = matches.Single(x => x.Value == something);
var b = matches.Single(x => x.Value == somethingElse);
share|improve this answer

You need something like this:

var a = collection.OfType<YourCollectionElementType>().FirstOrDefault(i=>i.Equals(something));
var b = collection.OfType<YourCollectionElementType>().FirstOrDefault(i=>i.Equals(somethingelse));

Your collection should implement IEnumerable at least to be able to use this code. It depends on what the type of your collection is. If it implements generic IEnumerable<T>, say it's List<YourCollectionElementType> or an array YourCollectionElementType[] then you don't need to use OfType<T>, i.e.

var a = collection.FirstOrDefault(i=>i.Equals(something));
var b = collection.FirstOrDefault(i=>i.Equals(somethingelse));

If your collection doesn't contain that value, a and/or b would get null values.

Actually you can read all these things in MSDN. LINQ is not that hard to learn, if you try For example:

  1. Enumerable.FirstOrDefault Method (IEnumerable)

  2. Enumerable.OfType Method

EDIT

In your comment you're saying that It is assured that only one value will be present. Is it of great importance that you need two separate variables? You could get the present value just like this:

object thevalue = collection.FirstOrDefault(i => i == something || i == somethingelse);

EDIT

Actually, I'd leave your loop as it is, only having added a line like this:

SomeObject a;
SomeObject b;
foreach(SomeObject so in collection)
{
    if(so.Value == something)
        a = so;
    else if(so.Value == somethingElse)
        b = so;
    if(a!=null && b!=null)
        break;
}

And if only one of the values is expected, then

SomeObject a;
SomeObject b;
foreach(SomeObject so in collection)
{
    if(so.Value == something)
    {
        a = so;
        break;
    }
    else if(so.Value == somethingElse)
    {
        b = so;
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
My question was - can you do this in 1 statement, i.e, iterate over the collection only once? –  Sam Aug 30 '12 at 1:09
    
Only one value of each something and somethingElse –  Sam Aug 30 '12 at 3:12
    
I have updated the pseudo code. –  Sam Aug 30 '12 at 3:16
1  
@Sam Then you can use answers by Jon Hanna or Risky Martin. I'd say they're what you need –  horgh Aug 30 '12 at 4:05

You could do this:

collection
    .Select(x => x.Value == something
        ? () => a = x
        : (x.Value == somethingElse
            ? () => b = x 
            : (Action)null))
    .Where(x => x != null)
    .ToArray()
    .ForEach(x => x());

I tested this code and it worked a treat.

If the collection is out on a database somewhere then I suggest this:

collection
    .Where(x => x.Value == something || x.Value == somethingElse)
    .ToArray()
    .Select(x => x.Value == something
        ? () => a = x
        : (x.Value == somethingElse
            ? () => b = x 
            : (Action)null))
    .Where(x => x != null)
    .ToArray()
    .ForEach(x => x());
share|improve this answer
2  
We don't know there aren't 100,000 non-matching items. –  Jon Hanna Aug 30 '12 at 2:00
    
That's not a triple-negative. That there isn't 100,000 items, which don't match, is not a thing that we know. Grabbing 100,000 items, mostly null and continually doing so after we've found matches, and then creating an array, certainly would be a problem. –  Jon Hanna Aug 30 '12 at 2:34
    
@JonHanna - Why is it a problem? I just created a list of 1,000,000 objects which matched on nearly 4,000 of them and it took only 52 milliseconds. –  Enigmativity Aug 30 '12 at 2:41
    
In memory or a database? I'd rather get two items from a database than 100,000, when I want two. –  Jon Hanna Aug 30 '12 at 8:16
1  
@Jon It filters before calling ToArray(), so no null values will be stored in a collection at any point. Regarding databases, I doubt that Select statement would work. –  Risky Martin Aug 30 '12 at 13:09

Sure you can, but I wouldn't recommend it. It would be cleaner to have your loop as you already have it now.

If you really wanted to know how, you could do this:

class SomeObject
{
    public string Value { get; set; }
}
var items = new[]
{
    new SomeObject { Value = "foo" },
    new SomeObject { Value = "bar" },
    new SomeObject { Value = "baz" },
};

var something = "foo";
var somethingElse = "baz";
var result = items.Aggregate(
    Tuple.Create(default(SomeObject), default(SomeObject)),
    (acc, item) => Tuple.Create(
        item.Value == something     ? item : acc.Item1,
        item.Value == somethingElse ? item : acc.Item2
    )
);
// result.Item1 <- a == new SomeObject { Value = "foo" }
// result.Item2 <- b == new SomeObject { Value = "baz" }
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Not sure If I understand your question but assume Something and SomethingElse are value type and known before the run-time, you can do like below in one statement.

        var FindItems = new[]
        {
            new SomeObject { Value = "SomethingElse" }
        };

        var CollectionItems = new[]
        {
            new SomeObject { Value = "Something" },
            new SomeObject { Value = "SomethingElse" }
        };

        var qSomeObject = CollectionItems
                          .Where(c => FindItems.Any(x => c.Value == x.Value));
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